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Art Digest: June 15—21

By Juni 21, 2020 No Comments
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Julia Kryshevich

Art Digest: June 15—21

Having happened once, some cases keep on echoing through time long afterwards. Artists from all over the world confront discrimination of any kind, supporting those who are at risk. Discover some vivid examples of artistic actions as well as other inspiring news of the week below.

P H O T O G R A P H Y 

‘See In Black’ launches a charitable photography print sale 

80 black photographers will share their vision of America through a series of prints telling the story of black people, their families and culture. The initiative has been inspired and organized by See In Black, the recently established coalition of negroid photographers and creatives. The mission of See In Black is to document history accurately, ‘with intentionality, respect, nuance and care’, which doesn’t necessarily imply making images of black figures. However, this time we’re going to see an exceptional photographic homage to black identity, which coincides with the Juneteenth (June, 19). Starting from that day, one can peruse the sale lots on the website of the coalition. The sale will end on July 3. What’s the price? $100 USD per each print. 

Juneteenth is an annual holiday in US, commemorating African-Americans freed from slavery. Exactly 155 years ago, on June 19, 1865 the Civil War ended and African-Americans were informed they were free. The holiday has been celebrated ever since, however, in the wake of tragic events such as Floyd Case, it has regained its’ meaning and relevance. The name of the holiday derives from the combination of the words June and 19. Juneteenth is also known as Freedom Day or Emancipation Day.

By Bobby Rogers. Photo_ See In Black

By Josef Adamu. Photo_ See In Black

By Marc Clennon. Photo_ See In Black

Meet the 2020 Street Photography Awards winners & finalists 

LensCulture Awards had it hard this year, just take the Street Photography competition: due to the pandemic and the follow-up safety measures, city streets have almost become lifeless… but not quite, fortunately. Despite everything, hundreds of photographers from different countries took part in the 2020 Edition of Street Photography Awards, either submitting the works done before the outbreak of the COVID-19 or even sending recently shot ones. Along with the series & single image winners, each of the 8 jurors of the Awards has made a special pick, briefly explaining one’s choice. Learn more about the winners & finalists from the LensCulture website. Or at least, enjoy our quick photo review below.

The jurors say, they had to make an extremely difficult choice this time. The percentage of the worthy works was high — many submissions had that special kind of storytelling, which distinguishes street photography from the other genres. 6 top winners, 8 special juror’s picks, and 25 finalists — 39 photographers from 19 countries in total, whose works charged with the right ambience and street feeling you will hopefully savor.

S O U N D 

Conceptual artist Ekene Ijeoma to show a ‘voice portrait’ of NYC residents

New York City is famous for its’ diversity in every way. Artist Ekene Ijeoma wants to capture and honor this unique city trait by recording the voices of its’ more than 8.5 million residents. The art project A Counting consists of recordings of citizens, each of them counting from 1 to 100 in one’s native language. The project’s website reports, there are 600 languages spoken in NYC, the records of 854 participants speaking in 70 languages have been already collected.

If you want to contribute to the initiative, you can either share own voice record (it might take about 5 minutes), or help the project by transcribing other calls (just 3 minutes). All you need to do is to enter the website and choose the language you want to transcribe, be it Persian, Hawaiian, or Mandarin-Chinese

Artist Ekene Ijeoma together with his group Poetic Justice at MIT Media Lab, and The People in response to the U.S. have established the project to support non-White and English-speaking communities through ‘language acknowledgement’. 

New York City is one of the most diverse yet segregated cities and, at a time of increasing division, ‘A Counting’ meditates on how to heal those divides and speculates on what a unified city could sound like. 

(Ekene Ijeoma) 

F A S H I O N 

Model Halima Aden to become first Vogue Arabia’s Diversity Editor-at-Large

Somali-American model Halima Aden will take over the newly minted position of Diversity Editor-at-Large in the Arabic edition of Vogue. Aden will be responsible for contributing a monthly column, thus, ‘highlighting hard-hitting social topics, inspiring personalities, and committed organizations with impactful work’. While the model says it’s a great pride for her to join the team of the Magazine, Vogue Arabia Editor-in-Chief, Manuel Arnaut finds this collaboration effective and meaningful. The Magazine needs extra support from a credible and competent figure, believes Arnaut

Still, what’s so impressive about the 22-year-old Halima Aden? She was the first model to wear hijab on a Vogue cover (June 2017 issue) as well as to walk with her head covered New York Fashion Week two years later. A UNICEF ambassador since 2018, Halima Aden embodies the world industry of modest fashion. Wearing hijab is a demand of Islamic faith, which is always covered in her modeling contracts. 

Photo_ Harper’s Bazaar

Halima Aden on Vogue Arabia cover. Photo Condé Nast

Photo_ Jean-Paul Pietrus_The Observer

C I N E M A 

Five films by Shirin Neshat available online for 24 hours 

Some of the most important works by the US-Iranian artist Shirin Neshat can be viewed online on the website of Goodman Gallery. From June 20—June 24 the Gallery will broadcast the following films one after another, which of them being available for an overnight: Women Without MenDreamers trilogy: Illusions and Mirrors; Sarah; Roja — Turbulent; Rapture; SoliloquyTooba; The Last Word — Looking for Oum Kulthum. Don’t miss the start of your favorite film (whatever it is) at 7 pm CEST on each of the days. 

An Iranian-born Shirin Neshat started her artistic career as a photographer creating politically engaged works that explore femininity in the context of the severe state regime. Later she switched to video works, which, though conveying a straight message, differ by a more poetic imagery and softer narratives. Shirin Neshat has both won a Golden Lion at the Venice Art Biennale (1999) and a Silver Lion at the Venice International Film Festival (2009), which is considered a rare achievement. She lives and works in New York.

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