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MBFW Russia: How It Was This Time (Part 2)

By November 1, 2020 No Comments
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Julia Kryshevich

MBFW Russia: How It Was This Time (Part 2)

In the previous part we’ve started reviewing trends spotted this season at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Russia, which ran phygitally from October 19 till 23. Having figured out how new femininity and gender fluidity are mirrored in the designers collections, we are proceeding with the rest of the trends. 

F U T U R E    I S    C O M I N G

Humankind has always wondered what the future might look like. While many of us tend to have a more positive vision of tomorrow, some highly sensitive and thinking individuals like artists and scientists often suggest their anti-utopian views. One thing’s for sure, whether wonderful or terrible, the future will be different (and it will never reach our minds). Nevertheless, it’s so exciting to think how things can be. Why not daydream? 

N.Legenda

Designer Olga Kapitonova, the founder of N.Legenda, suggests that the future is already here. At least, the models walking the runway at N.Legenda latest fashion show made us think we’re ready to go into outer space. No, they didn’t wear any space suits, but the colours featured — corrugated silver, metallic petrol, and galaxy blue — created the right sci-fi futuristic look. Tunics, suits, coats, and jackets from the N.Legenda SS 2021 collection are also rather agender, which broadens the scope for experiments.

Participants of ‘Fashion a la Russe’ project 

Participants of the Krasnodar-based ‘Fashion a la Russe’ project boldly forecasted the vogue trends for the upcoming season. Kazakova Olga suggests that attached decorative prints ideally match flower frocks (some heavy boots like grinders are preferred so that the entire look doesn’t look fruity). Klimovskikh Valeria (KLIMOVSKIKH) prefers adding mysterious symbolic elements to the outfits, while Nadezhda Belousova (ValNa Fashion) bets on the hand-crafted capes that resemble a fishing net. 

B&D Institute 

All new is well overlooked past, everybody knows it. So to come up with fresh ideas in fashion you’d better ‘confer’ with some acknowledged couturiers. Just like the students of the Moscow Institute of Business and Design (B&D) did. Inspired by the figure of Alexander McQueen, his aggressive and vulnerable, romantic and passionate, and just extraordinary manner, they created a series of controversial and highly stylish outfits made from the biodegradable material. ‘What does the future of fashion look like?’ — the B&D students ask the viewer and immediately respond. ‘It’s hardly possible to explain. Just watch’. 

LOKOTO

The motto for the new collection by LOKOTO could be: ‘Future’s not everybody’. In line with the early 20th century avant-garde artists, Lena Anikeeva, ex graphic designer and LOKOTO’s CEO, decided to cut off the extra to prepare for the bright future. Just three colours of the basic palette chosen (red, black, and white), direct lines, and clear geometrical shapes — the recipe for success seems easy. Lena Anikeeva finds that clothes are like architecture — it’s the silhouette and convenience that are of primary importance. And we couldn’t agree more. 

kØd

Another version of the future a la avant-garde belongs to the Ukrainian-born brand kØd (Dutch for ‘flesh’). The latest collection of the brand stands out through a series of careful red stitches, thorough colour selection (the trio chosen by LOKOTO plus blue), and unexpected accessories. So, forward into the future, with some flowers in your hand? 

T R I U M P H   O F   T H E   C O L O U R

Spring and summer periods seem the perfect time to dress brightly. Sounds easy, doesn’t it? Yet just a few of us dare to express themselves through an intense colour palette. Taking an example from some fashionistas might help. 

1377

Ode to colour green in the new collection by 1377. Although newly-minted (tailor Sasha Zhurina founded 1377 three years ago in Volgograd), the brand regularly takes part in major fashion events worldwide such as Paris, Shanghai, and Tbilisi Fashion Weeks. The upcoming spring promises to be enchanting with a broad green colour spectrum suggested by the designer: emerald, pistachio, pine, moss, sea green etc. Loose shirts and coats and jackets emphasize the laid-back mood of the collection, while the only female mannequin featured shows 1377 is a menswear brand (rather unisex at heart, though).

TSIGANOVA and Konyukhov Art

Victoria Tsiganova is not only a prominent singer, but also a designer. Her latest collection has been issued in collaboration with the famous Russian traveler Fyodor Konyukhov, who just like many gifted people has various genii. Apart from traveling, Fyodor creates paintings, which inspired TSIGANOVA to set up a very colourful vivacious series devoted to his art. The designer isn’t afraid of bold combinations of colour and styles, she also generously embellishes her outfits with prints and patterns. That’s how an artist’s imagination might probably look like.

Annais Yucra 

The Peru-based designer Annais Yucra names herself an ‘artivist’. In her collections she calls for freedom of artistic expression and raises social issues. The SS 2021 by Annais Yucra is built upon colour blocking principles, yet the colour palette engaged is the very definition of tenderness. All shades of marshmallows are featured in the garments, while the cuts either follow the body shape or flirtatiously conceal it. 

Maison Kaleidoscope 

Taking on the role of a jungle dweller? Only green lights with the new collection by Maison Kaleidoscope. Fabrics from different parts of the world such as Egyptian cotton, Italian viscose, and Australian wool fed into the wild animal kingdom with every kind of flamingo, cobra, cheetah, and tiger present. No, it looks nothing but a masquerade, no exaggeration here. Just elegant facetious looks moderately spiced with spots-and-stripes prints, feathers, and embroidered fauna silhouettes. Trends spotted: highly-set cloche hats from the 1920s and woolen balaclavas.

B A C K   T O   T H E   R O O T S 

A few Yakut designers are on the list at MBFW this time. Together with some other couturiers they willingly show their belonging, praising the native cultural practices and making them available to the wider public. Finding inspiration in the local is a new auspicious trend, which is clearly manifested in different fields of visual arts (fashion is no exception).

Marfa Fedorova

Returning to the roots in the view of Yakut designer Marfa Fedorova initially means getting closer to nature. Reminiscing about the beauty of home boreal forests, Marfa Fedorova introduces purely natural hues within her new collection: e.g. sky blue, pine, sandstone, and clay. If it’s a choice, just loose cuts are preferred. And the sweetest ushanka-hats in tow. 

050

‘саһарҕа’ (Yakut for ‘sunrise’) is the first collection by the brand 050 to be performed on the principles of upcycling. Old vintage fabrics have formed the basis for a series of mostly snow-white authentic garments. Much focus on details plus unusual tricks like tied-up ribbons instead of shoes on feet. ‘Culture keeps on thriving, rebirthing out of the previous forms of life’ — so goes the 050 statement.

SOLKO

Another Yakut brand SOLKO doesn’t get stumped by the work-life balance issue. The new collection by SOLKO features smart dresses, raincoats, skirts, and suits that a woman can wear both for work and leisure. Warm intense shades of the garments together with a ‘frosty’ makeup (apple cheeks, red lips, and white skin) enhance the vigor and decisiveness of the owner. Shirt collar is a new trend.

LES by Lesia Paramonova

A completely different vision of the call of nature was presented by designer Lesia Paramonova. Her brand ‘LES’ (Russian for ‘forest’) went pagan this season paying special attention to rituals. Images of birds symbolize freedom and cohesion of matter and spirit, while beads on bag handles might attract good fortune. The colour palette is no less exciting: cold hues like blue and gray stand for water, while warm and tender ones embody spring and warmth and blossoming flowers.

That’s it for now. See you at the next MBFW in spring 🙂 

All photographs provided by the press-office of Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Russia