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Tutorial on how to create contemporary art

By /ART/, /BLOG/

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L i s a  L u k y a n o v a

Tutorial on how to create contemporary art

Nothing you can’t turn into art. Artists were proving it over and over again, without seeing the end of their experiments. In our article “BEING ON LOCKDOWN. How to find inspiration in everyday objects?” were shown the examples of implementing simple and unremarkable things into a piece of art. 

Today we are ready to inspire you again and present a little tutorial on how to create a contemporary art. This is a process of combining the mental, physical and essentially emotional effort of creating something that brings artists together over time and across media.

What Is It Made Of?

It could be anything!

Sheila Hicks, Pillar of Inquiry/Supple Column, 2013–14

Hicks has long been concerned with the intricacies of interfacing design of fibre objects with the environment that contains them, in this case in a museum building.

For Hicks, color, form, and texture are inextricably linked. She wants her work to ignite our urge to touch.  “I think that is important, the wanting: the desire to hold it in your hands, to befriend it, to see if it bites, or if it’s compatible to your existence, and in what way,” she said.

Color, shape and grain are intrinsically linked for Hicks. She wishes her artwork to ignite our desire to touch.

Liz Deschenes on Tilt/Swing (360º field of vision, version 1), 2009

Deshene’s work broadens photographic ideas by exploring the links between the mechanics of vision, image creation processes and modes of display.

The idea of her work is to make the viewer to look everywhere not only straight ahead as they usually observe masterpieces in the gallery. “The viewer takes on what would be the movements of the view camera, and the goal is to liberate the viewer so the viewer can make decisions about how they navigate the piece.”

Kerry Tribe, H.M., 2009

Tribe provides physical mechanisms of image movement in the content of its works. H.M. is a reconstructed portrait of Henry Molison, known in scientific literature as Patient H.M., who’s had a bad memory loss since his lobotomy. As with memory, the tape is unstable and decomposes over time.

How Is It Made?

Just be inspired!

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, The Myriad Motives of Men, 2014

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye paints rapidly, normally finishing his canvases in a single day.  She brings them back from her memories and remarks, and draws her inspiration from art history, by developing her thoughts in books, pictures and, in the final, on the canvas itself.

She doesn’t say much about who and where these figures are, preferring to keep her compositions open to any plot that the audience may bring to them.

Luther Price, Sorry, 2005–12

Luther Price once described the value of process: “It’s not always about what you are working on…..but how it gets there.” It took him seven years and 80 handmade slides to get to his collage-film, Sorry. Like large portions of his work—encompassing performance, films, and slides—Sorry includes scenes of suburban family life melded, in this case, with a 1940s film about Jesus and the Crucifixion.

Who Makes It?

Everyone.

Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker, Work/Travail/Arbeid, 2017

Work/Travail/Arbeid features seven dancers and seven musicians performing continuously during museum hours, which coincide, as De Keersmaeker has noted, with her company’s regular workday. The dancers twirl, run, skip, sway, guided by chalk patterns they have drawn on the floor (which they must redraw every hour) and by the unrestricted circulation of museumgoers.

Revital Cohen & Tuur Van Balen on 75 Watt, 2013

In 2013, the artists Revital Cohen and Tuur Van Balen traveled to Zhongshan, China to create an artwork at the White Horse Electric Factory. There, they made a film in which workers at an assembly line perform choreographed movements while assembling an enigmatic object.

Contemporary Art is a freedom!

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The rise of Eastern European brands: new players upping the game

By /BLOG/, /FASHION/

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A l i n a  S t e b l o v s k a y a

The rise of Eastern European brands: new players upping the game

When we think of fashion and the main fashion capitals, Eastern Europe does not immediately come to mind. This is not a surprise too: historically, we have praised French and Italian couturiers, often neglecting everyone else. However, the times are changing, the map of fashion is expanding with places like Eastern Europe becoming one of the new fashion hubs.

Even though the oldest brands have maintained their timeless status, new players join the game, and they have a lot more to prove. In order to claim their place on the fashion scene, they need to be more creative and innovative than some of the “old boys”. And this makes them even more interesting to watch.

Nehera 

This Slovak brand have been the talk of the town for the last few years. Originally founded back in1930s by a Czechoslovakian entrepreneur, Jan Nehera, who opened more than 130 stores across the globe before the World War II jeopardised everything. The fashion brand was reinvented in 2014/ 2015 with the help of French designer and stylist Samuel Drira. Since then, Nehera keeps intriguing with its clean yet intricate silhouettes, oversized fit and prevalence of neutral tones, even after Drira and Nehera parted ways.

Nehera 

Nehera 

Nehera 

Nanushka

On the crossroads between sustainability and creativity, this Hungarian brand has become known for its vegan leather staples. Founded back in 2006 by Sandra Sandor, it was not really known to many up until 2016 when it has become “insta-famous”. In 2020, with its modern twist on bohemian style and strong stance on eco-conscious matters, we can say that it is there to stay.

Nanushka

Nanushka

Nanushka

Bevza 

It is not often that we see Ukrainian brands on the podiums alongside with the bigger names. However, in case of Bevza, this is a very different story. Established in 2006 by Svitlana Bevza, it has been exploring modern interpretations of the timeless classics. Its minimal yet highly creative and intricate designs did not leave the chance for the brand to go unnoticed in the fashion community.

Bevza

Bevza

Bevza

Daily Sleeper 

Another Ukrainian brand, founded by two fashion editors Kate Zubarieva and Aysa Varetsa, that put the Zeitgeist at its core. Before the pandemic broke out and the need in comfortable, yet stylish loungewear be worn to stay in and go out, became evident, Daily Sleeper has conquered the hearts of the global fashion community. Worn by influencers and celebrities, from Leandra Medine to Dakota Fanning, it might not be on the podiums, but will definitely occupy a permanent spot in many closets.

Daily Sleeper 

Daily Sleeper 

Daily Sleeper 

Lesyanebo

Founded in 2015 by a Russian designer Olesya Shipovskaya without the help of investors, the brand featured a very minimal collection of oversized power suits for women. Things have changed since them, and now Lesyanebo, worn by many fashionistas, has expanded its clothing line while honouring the cultural heritage of its motherland, getting inspired by Russian poetry, novels and fairytales.

Lesyanebo

Lesyanebo

Lesyanebo

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Hoist the Colors! Bright Accents in Make-Up

By /BEAUTY/, /BLOG/

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A l e x a n d r a  A z a r o v a

Hoist the Colors! Bright Accents in Make-Up

‘Summer I’m in love’ – the Cure could have sung this song differently had not Friday got in the way. Let’s restore justice and express our warmest welcome to dear summer which will be here just in several days. And – hoist the colors in honor of the arrival of the most inspiring season by adding some bright accents to our everyday look. Where, when and how, along with some tips to be a real showstopper – here is our best advice.

Modesty first

To be bright prepare to be modest! One accent at a time is the most important rule of dealing with bright colors when applied to everyday make-up. Set apart a show or a fantasy make-up we won’t want to walk around wearing all the colors of the rainbow. Your best pick will be one accent of one bright color in a generally neutral look. A natural make-up in nudes or pastels will set off a bold color and at the same time be a canvas for your creativity.

Where to apply – lips…

Best advice is to follow the nature (it works for nearly everything, right?). What are the most expressive features of our face? Eyes and lips – so let’s attract more attention to them! All sort of vibrant reds, noble violets, velvet browns and deep oranges win the game for juicy seductive lips which are just impossible to look away from. Remember to keep your eyes natural in this case – light contouring with an eye pencil, a stroke of neutral eyeshadow and mascara will be just enough.

Tip: be sure to outline your lips precisely with a well sharpened lip pencil as the contour should be really neat. Colorless anti-feathering lip pencils (e. g. by Make Up For Ever of MAC) do a great job in keeping your vibrant lips in place all day long.

… and eyes

If you feel like playing with color – your eyes suit it best. Though applying bright eyeshadows in day make-up in most cases will look blatant, we won’t say ‘no’ to a clever dash of eyeliner of some vivid color.

To win the game dealing with bright accents, don’t forget the general rules of complimentary colors. Yellow and orange tints are the best choice for blue eyes; brown ones will appear most attractive when highlighted with various blues, while the beauty of green eyes will flourish against pinks, violets and lilacs.

Tip: if you haven’t got a color eyeliner there is no need to rush to the nearest make-up store. Wet your eyeliner brush and pass upon the eyeshadow cake. You may want to repeat it several times to grab enough color. Be sure to try the color on your palm first.

And the main rule is… keep experimenting and welcome the summer!

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Interview with Victoria Rosenman

By /ART/, /BLOG/, /INTERVIEW

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I r i n a  R u s i n o v i c h

Interview with Victoria Rosenman

1.Victoria, you have an art education and you planned to devote yourself to painting. What was the key moment to choosing photography as your medium?

There were exactly two key moments that led me to photography:
My familiarity with graphics and painting and unfortunately also my subjective or false perception of artistic value. In the first year of study, I felt very privileged when it came to painting techniques, because I was convinced that my years of experience as a child in a Russian painting school full of discipline and all conventions proved my skill and that I was able to do something better than other people. I demonstrated lifelike illustrations on paper or canvas, but they were without content. This demonstration of the inauthentic, technical ability resulted in my first strong artistic block.
At that time my professor recommended that I write down all my suffering and other emotional states, so that as semester papers and at exhibitions I presented all the texts and formulas that came from within. The reaction of the audience was rather neutral, which made me very outraged and sad. Nobody wanted to read subjective pseudophilosophical texts by an art student. So I decided on stronger visualisation so that outsiders can better engage with my thoughts and concepts. So I started to reproduce the content of what was written in the form of photography: texts became images.

Another reason why I chose  photography and why I also continue the project „From the destruction of a muse“ (the upcoming exhibition „Don’t kill me“ is another component of the project) , are interpersonal relationships that inspire and frighten me, which I ultimately “preserve” as an eternal requiem in various forms of representation.
I started documenting an extraordinary relationship. I wanted to capture the personality of a person because this presence and aura in a good sense nourished and moved me. For me, this person was a muse – a source of inspiration. I later found out that certain characteristics and polarities of a human personality are very appealing to me and I want to „hold onto“ more of the psyche of everyone. Photography was able to clarify my visions and a certain stage of my relationships and trigger further, productive thought processes.

2.Your oevre is inspired by classical photography; light, shapes and color. What do you think is the starting point in your work?

I would not say that they are classic photographic representations. I mostly take pictures outdoors in daylight – I use almost no artificial light sources because I love painterly aesthetics and the transition or mixing of photos to and / or painting is very liberating. I don’t want to commit myself to a specific medium, the photos I take are part of the whole. Texts, installations and, of course, the “muses” are part of the whole. Often at my openings people are exhibited in front of their photographic images, which I call my muses. So I offer the viewer to compare the „living“, „breathing“ reality with my perception. Speaking of comparisons: if we come back to the original question: the classic view of my photos is explained or visible to the extent that, of course, I do not like depth of field or photograph everything sharply and light / shadow plays often achieve painterly effects that are reminiscent of old master paintings.

3.Choosing a Muse is the main part of the process for your works. Tell us about how you choose them?

I watch a lot, but I’m not looking for people who should become my muses. People who work with me on the project, despite their openness, radiate a lot of discrepancy and are not afraid to show their vulnerability. To recognise such a character, of course, I also have to spend some time with this person. The revelation of the inner polarities of a muse is the origin and beginning of my artistic work. The photographic illustration or texts are only final results or memorabilia, a valuable process that documents an interpersonal relationship – a devotion between artist and muse, an interplay of power and dependency, guilt and innocence – a mutual challenge. I also write about this in my manifestos, which I have now published in the form of an art book (the book can be purchased at the opening of „don’t kill me“)
Of course, a discrepancy between the outside and inside of a person is always very exciting and a certain appearance often leads us to get to know the personality of the person better. In the end, mutual trust counts and good friendships have developed from many processes.

4.Your manifesto speaks of a certain “seismographic perception of a person”, please explain what exactly this means and how it is displayed in your works.

My “muses” should be able to show themselves to be as vulnerable as possible. Of course, this requires a lot of preparatory work, a process that I call very valuable. In the process, we build trust, open up, deliver each other. You go through different phases together, which are sometimes attractive, sometimes painful. Later, a clear psychogram of a personality emerges – in the case for me: a photographic image of the „current“ muse. This means that a „seismographic“ approach means a meticulous recording or demonstration of the characteristics of a muse.

5.The starting points in your work are eternal human conflicts; power and dependence, destruction and creation. What exactly do you project in your works? Process or decision

The process is supposed to satisfy me in the first place and when it happens, I automatically trigger new thoughts and thus also offer solutions. Whether these solutions can be applied to other individuals is less important to me. It is enough if questions arise. „Mark“ questions people – I like this idea.

6.Describe what beauty means to you in a nutshell.

I think there are many types of beauty and their intensities increase or decrease in different contexts. For this I reveal my first, self-invented formula, which I presented on a DinA4 sheet of paper in my first year of graduation:
Degradation / effect = value.

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Art Digest: May 18—24

By /ART/, /BLOG/
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Julia Kryshevich

Art Digest: May 18—24

Could you ever thought Amazon to be a fashion retailer? And what about celebrity portraits being sold at Christie’s special edition auction? This week has been quite eventful — find some highlights carefully picked by the editorial below.

Vogue partners with Amazon under A Common Thread program 

Legendary Vogue and the Council of Fashion Designers of America decided to cooperate with Amazon as one of the world’s largest e-commerce platforms. Outfits by the 20 local fashion brands will be featured at amazon.com very soon (though Amazon had almost no experience in fashion retail before). All the designers presented have been hand-picked by the Vogue & CFDA experts. The idea is to support fashion industry representatives financially and help them promote their brands in such difficult times like now.

This step has been taken as a part of A Common Thread program initiated in late March. A Common Thread started with a series of videos published at vogue.com where participants selected share how their lives and working experience have been affected by the coronavirus. Among the storytellers there are fashion designers, creative directors, account managers, patternmakers, and other professionals from the field of fashion, both established and emerging. Vogue readers are supposed to help the participants by making online-donations to the fund or texting THREAD to 44-321. Now there is also an opportunity to buy something by the favorite brand through Amazon. By the way, in case the project proves successful, this could be the beginning of a long-term partnership between the magazine and the e-commerce giant, says Anna Wintour, Vogue Editor-in-Chief.

In Bloom_Vogue editor’s pick

La Vie Boheme_Vogue editor’s pick

The Bright Side_Vogue editor’s pick

Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams now in China, beginning late July 

The terrific Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams exhibition is back offline! This time in China — the show will be held in the Long Museum West Bund in Shanghai from July 28 to October 4. Interestingly enough, the exhibition was first shown at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris and later at the V&A in London, until the virtual tour of the exhibition became available to the audience a month ago. A free one-hour video takes viewers behind the scenes of the show, providing them with a great general view. But in case you are in China in the second half of the summer, now you have a chance to see the exhibition for yourself. 

What do we mean by saying that Dior was the designer of dreams? His incredible talent, time, and effort invested into the evaluation of the brand? Yes, but not just his. While Christian Dior himself stood at the origins of the Dior empire and took its’ creative guidance until his death in 1957, there were 6 other creative directors in the history of the fashion house. Yves Saint Laurent, Marc Bohan, Gianfranco Ferré, John Galliano, Raf Simons, and finally Maria Grazia Chiuri are the designers who made Dior (each in one’s own way) into what it is now. So, point taken — the exhibition is dedicated to those who made all this magic. And just some numbers: the show at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris running from July 2017 to January 2018 attracted more than 708,000 spectators. The London exhibition at the V&A in 2019 was extended and looked even more impressive (the video tour will help you to ensure that from your own experience).

Call for Entries: LensCulture Critics’ Choice 2020

If you feel like there is nothing happening in the period of general lull, welcome some new opportunities, provided by LensCulture! The world’s leading web-resource devoted to contemporary photography invites keen photographers (no matter how old they are and where they come from) to take part in the new competition called Critics’ Choice. Critics’ Choice is unique in that it has the biggest judging panel through the history of LensCulture contests. This time more than 20 world-famous experts will choose about 60 photographers distinguished by their talent and creative vision. Among the critics there are editors-in-chief, photo editors, curators, art-directors, and other impressive figures in the field of contemporary photography. You can apply for free, learn more about the conditions from the contest website.

Celebrity Portraits by Mark Seliger at Christie’s COVID Relief Auction 

The new advocacy campaign by Christie’s RADArt4Aid will be held from May 28 to June 12 in the format of an online auction. The famous auction house partners with the photographer of no less popularity Mark Seliger — his portraits of celebrities will be featured on the Christie’s online platform for sale. The photographs of Snoop Dogg, Kurt Cobain, Leonardo DiCaprio, Billie Eilish, Tom Hanks, Jennifer Aniston, Brad Pitt, and many others are expected to bring some profits that are later given for charity. The receivers include America’s Food Fund, American Red Cross, Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS’ COVID-19 Emergency Assistance Fund and etc. The virtual Viewing Room is already available on the Christie’s website. 

The two new sale concepts introduced by Christie’s this May are VICE and VIRTUE — the mutually reinforcing themes of the upcoming online auctions from the Post-War and Contemporary Art department. While VICE section is devoted to such human tendencies as yielding to temptations and escaping from reality, VIRTUE, in contrast, shows the art of positive endeavor. Since it’s especially relevant to speak of hope in the times of COVID-19 outbreak, the auction organizers want to support those who do a lot for the general relief. The Mark Seliger: RADArt4Aid online project which has arisen as a result of the collaboration between the photographer and Red Carpet Advocacy movement (RAD) is a special addition to VIRTUE section, which aims at raising money for charitable organizations.

Jennifer Aniston, Los Angeles, CA, 1995.Photo_ christies.com

Kurt Cobain, Kalamazoo, MI, 1993 Photo_ christies.com

Leonardo DiCaprio, Los Angeles, 1999 Photo_ christies.com

Biennale für aktuelle Fotografie in Mannheim extended  

The biggest curated photography festival in Germany extends its exhibitions. Biennale für aktuelle Fotografie (The Biennial for Contemporary Photography) will last longer this year on all of its’ three sets — in Mannheim, Heidelberg, and Ludwigshafen. For example, Yesterday’s News Today are on at the Heidelberger Kunstverein until May 31, while When Images Collide at Wilhelm-Hack-Museum runs till September 13. The timeline for all shows is available on the Biennale website (the page being continuously updated, so watch out). There is also a series of virtual visits of the exhibitions open.

Biennale für aktuelle Fotografie takes place every two years at the most important cultural venues of the three cities, such as Mannheim, Heidelberg (Baden-Württemberg state), and Ludwigshafen (Rhineland-Palatinate state). The concept of the Biennale applies to the all 6 exhibition areas engaged in the cities mentioned. Each year the festival is guided by an internationally reknown guest curator. The 2020 Edition runs under the name The Lives and Loves of Images (among the local exhibitions are All Art is Photography, Between Art and Commerce, Reconsidering Icons, Walker Evans Revisited, When Images Collide, and Yesterday’s News Today). The curator is David Campany, who is a program director at the International Center of Photography in New York. 

New record set by Sotheby’s (and again, it’s an online auction) 

Perhaps you remember that the Sotheby’s online auction which ran on April 21 set a profit record of $6.4 million. Well, it has been beaten again Contemporary Art Day: Online auction held by Sotheby’s on May 14 achieved a total of $13.7 million. In short, 117 lots, participants from 35 countries, and 29% of the buyers taking part in the auction sales for the first time. The most highly estimated painting Christopher Wool’s Untitled (1988) was auctioned off for $1.2 million. The following top lots run in the order of decreasing last bid —  Window Study No. 4 (1985) by Brice Marden ($1.1 million), Broadway and 64th (1984) by Richard Este ($860,000), Witching (1999) by Yoshitomo Nara ($740,000). The general auction overview is available here. Who knows, maybe the online sales will become a credible alternative to the traditional format of the auction one day? We’ll see.

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The loco-down life: 3 tips to survive

By /ART/, /BLOG/

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A l e x a n d r a  K h a r k o v s k a y a

The loco-down life: 3 tips to survive

The world will not be the same again. Blah, blah, blah. Boring.

What about creativity, huh? The demand for regular products has fallen, which means it’s time for creators who will show how not to go wild in a new reality with the help of irregular things. Use hand sanitizer and scroll your future wishlist:

  • The Sun blanket
  • The Social Distancing Gloves
  • Whatever with words “You`re too close”

The Sun blanket

Yes, we`re done with Voldemort, his name can not be pronounced (oops).. However, during global isolation, there are stricter taboo words that each of us utters with a sinking heart: “a barbecue”, “travels”, ”a big hug” or, omg, “A DIALOG”! Fortunately, Paul Cocksedge with Here Comes the Sun blanket found a way out for safe picnics. Now, in addition to sunbathing, you can become a part of the sun itself! The blankets construction was created in compliance with the recommended 2-meter distance. At the same time, Paul shares instructions for creating a blanket on his Instagram. Check it out and make it work!

The Social Distancing Gloves

Now things speak for you! Of course, it can be difficult to tell a person directly to stay away. But when, if not now? Liberals want freedom, but designers are already using it. America, represented by designer Joe Doucet, offers an alternative (speaking with the tongue in cheek) to warn strangers to keep their distance. Well, it’s not a bad way to look cocky in any situation.

Whatever with words “You`re too close”

On may 31, it will be exactly 10 years since the release of the single „Closer to the Edge“ by 30 seconds to Mars. However, in social networks Jared suggests to refrain from any kind of closeness. Unless only to the source of youth, which apparently he actively uses. On the group`s official website anyone can order masks with the popular phrase “ if you can read this, you are too close“. For each mask sold, the Mars store will donate a PPE mask to organizations that need it in their local community.

Send emails and postcards to each other. Now this is especially true when the reasons for congratulations come up with you, well, or the guys from Kaart Blanche do. Once it started with silly birthday cards for my family and friends, but expanded to a global goal: to improve communication of people around the world. Look at their website and get stuck there for a couple of minutes. By the way, they also have “If you can read this you’re too close “ masks. You`re welcome. 

Yes, here’s another, one of the company’s founders — Lars Lagaisse — Creator of Instagram masks “Which Kardashian are you?” and Which VB are you?” .

Shake your lockdown up!
OXOX — PURPLEHAZE

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Bronzers: How to Apply for a Natural Look

By /BEAUTY/, /BLOG/

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A l e x a n d r a  A z a r o v a

Bronzers: How to Apply for a Natural Look

We’re eager to step into the first summer month, and the issue of boasting a fresh sun-kissed look is more important than ever. Though the lockdown has practically ruined our plans of catching first warm sunrays during long walks in the awakening nature, we still can fix the situation by using right make-up products. Meet and greet bronzers – your faithful savior from all the dullness and fatigue of the gone-for-good spring. With a subtle touch of color you will enhance your complexion and create a fresh, slightly suntanned look as if there had been no staying at home all this time. Here are our tips for best results.

 

Colors and finishes

After long weeks of lockdown we naturally feel the urge to add some color to our lives and looks. While no one is going to stop you from using bright colors in make-up, a bronzer should be used like a spice in cuisine: in tiny quantities, subtly and wisely.

The color of the bronzer is a key point to success. Choose a product that is just one tone darker than your skin – always remember that to intensify the color is much easier than to wipe off its excess. Unlike sculpting products, conceived to create shadows (almost always cool), bronzers come in warm colors. Don’t chase too ‘sunny’ color – browns or oranges – instead opt for beiges, nudes and light golds.

Tip: pick matte or satin finish – it will look natural on skin, be it normal, oily or dry. Too much shimmering can turn you into a drag queen which is obviously not the goal of everyday make-up. If you feel like adding a bit of glow you can always cover up with a subtle touch of a shimmer.

Tools

The best rule in choosing the right brush is the following: thick textures should be applied with densely set brushes – light textures go with fluffy ones. Consequently, for a gentle stroke of a bronzer nothing will work better than a powder, a blush or a contour brush. We won’t recommend either a kabuki or a fan brush – the former being too dense, the latter – too wide-spreading which is hard to control.

Tip: prior to applying the bronzer on your face, be sure to shake off or tap the brush on the back of your palm – it will eliminate the excess of color letting you apply the bronzer softly and evenly.

Where to apply

Cannot be easier – on the areas that would get sun-kissed first: cheekbones, the top of the nose, the upper forehead and the tip of your chin. Don’t try to really sculpt your face with the bronzer (we have another product for that) – rather create a light veil with free swirling movements.

Tip: you can settle the bronzer (as well as the whole make-up) with fixing spray. Some of them come with translucent shimmer – just what you may need for a fresh look.

Top 5 Aspiring Fashion Photographers 2020: Caleb & Gladys, Tony Kelly, Mattew Brookes, Amanda Charcian, Glen Luchford

By /BLOG/, /FASHION/

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L i s a  L u k y a n o v a

Top 5 Aspiring Fashion Photographers 2020: Caleb & Gladys, Tony Kelly, Mattew Brookes, Amanda Charcian, Glen Luchford

The previous week we published an article about world-famous photographers, who are exactly in the public eye of everyone who is interested in fashion and art. Right now we are going to tell you about Top 5 Aspiring Contemporary Photographers 2020 such as Caleb & Gladys, Tony Kelly, Mattew Brookes, Amanda Charcian, Glen Luchford. 

 

Caleb & Gladys – @calebandgladys

Caleb and Gladys are fashion advertising photography duo from Singapore. They are famous for their surrealistic and dramatic manner of creating images that are both visually stunning and at the same time invariably aimed at redefining boundaries. 

Since the beginning of their photography career they have been published in many international magazines such as Tatler, Harper’s Bazaar, L’Officiel, Papercut & Vogue Italia’s PhotoVogue and many others.

It is an interesting fact that photography for both of them was just a hobby at first. They were specialized in completely different areas of IT and Economics. However, on this example, we can see how hobby turns into lifestyle job.

Caleb and Gladys

Caleb and Gladys

Caleb and Gladys

Tony Kelly- @tonykellyworld

Tony Kelly  is a photographer and director of fine arts. Based in Los Angeles, he is known for his cinematic style of photography with exquisite aesthetics and vibrant use of color.

At the beginning, his career was far away from fashion. He spent years of his life covering people and places that most of us would never want to see. For example, the civil war in Rwanda and the war in Afghanistan.  

Perhaps, because of this he is not afraid of showing real emotions and real people on his images: dynamism, sex, relationships, boundaries that are violated, beautiful men, beautiful women, ugly emotions, ecstasy, fierce color, dark black etc. 

His work has been published in Vanity Fair, Vanity Fair Italia, Vogue Paris, Vogue Greece, GQ and other prestigious fashion magazines.

Tony Kelly

Tony Kelly

Tony Kelly

Matthew Brookes- @mattewbrookesphoto

Matthew Brooks is a UK fashion photographer who was raised in South Africa. Today, splitting between Paris and New York, Brookes enjoys photographing sports men and women and dancers.

He is known for his simple and casual style. Brooks has photographed editorial articles for magazines such as GQ Style Germany, British GQ Style, Town & Country. 

Matthew Brookes

Matthew Brookes

Matthew Brookes

Amanda Charcian- @amanda_charcian

Amanda Charchian (b. Los Angeles, CA, 1988) creates work with a feminine sensuality that celebrates the erotically charged. She captures the intimacy between her and people who pose to her camera. 

Charchian’s black and white photographs portray women, frequently friends of hers, in abstract settings, on which she paints simple forms in daring primary colours, highlighting the female form.

Her commercial clients include Gucci, Bulgari, Chloe, Cartier, Nordstrom, Glossier, MCM and others.

Amanda Charchian

Amanda Charchian

Amanda Charchian

Glen Luchford- @_glen_luchford

A self-educated Brighton-born photographer, Luchford left school at the age of 15 and moved to London where he worked in a hair salon. For the first time Luchford signed with the New York agency Art + Commerce at the age of 24.  Luchford has successfully exemplified a visual language that had never before been seen in the fashion or fine art arenas, launching the photographer as one of his generation’s most imaginative talents.

For the last thirty years, he has worked with most of fashion’s leading magazines including British Vogue, French Vogue, Vanity Fair, and many more.

Glen Luchford

Glen Luchford

Glen Luchford

Defining Fashion Zeitgeist 2020

By /BLOG/, /FASHION/

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A l i n a  S t e b l o v s k a y a

Defining Fashion Zeitgeist 2020

As any cultural phenomenon, fashion cannot exist on its own. It inevitably reflects the current trends in the society, and whenever it fails to respond fast to these trends, the consequences will follow.  

For instance, in the past few years we have seen an uptake in body positive movement and inclusivity. Some brands quickly picked it up, while others refused to listen. And just like that – the famous Victoria’s Secret show had to come to an end and the brand sales started to drop, because they were not able to adapt fast enough to the spirit of the time.

Climate change Vivienne Westwood

Climate change Vivienne Westwood

To define the 2020 zeitgeist, we can use three words: environmental activism, liberation, pandemic. These words might not immediately make you think of fashion, but yet they are what is on many people’s mind, which forces fashion world to yet again adapt and respond.

Environmental activism changes the agenda

 If 1960s changed the world by bringing fast fashion, 2020s are going in reverse by popularising the slow fashion movement. Ever since the documentary “The True Cost” came out in 2015, it has been out in the open: fashion industry is not sustainable. Then 2019 brought us climate change protests with Generation Z becoming a new force expressing their opinions. Now there is no way back from having sustainability on the agenda and fashion industry is quickly filling up with new eco-conscious buzz words, like “recycling”, “upcycling”, “carbon footprint”, “resale”, “ethical fashion”, and many more.

New kind of liberation

Millennials and Generation Z are now getting more and more power in the consumer space, and they are not there not joke around. They are the representatives of a new multi passionate workforce that is often self-employed. This often gives them higher than average disposable income and allows to dictate their own rules. Freedom from the outdated social constructs, strong opinions and readiness to invest more in the brands that they believe in and that have a clear mission are what defines them. And this overarching feeling of freedom is what determines their style choices too.

Facemask

Facemask

Pandemic

The definition of 2020 zeitgeist would not be complete without mentioning the pandemic. Millions of people have been forced to stay home and adjust to a new norm. Many had to start shopping online more, spend more time in tracksuits and homewear, creating a stronger need for clothes to be more comfortable and wearable than ever. The former symbol of air pollution — face masks —  have become our new must-have. And we all have been forced to pause. Reflect. Re-evaluate.

Art Digest: May 11—17

By /ART/, /BLOG/, /NEWS/
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Julia Kryshevich

Art Digest: May 11—17

The situation is evolving: while some countries try opening museums and let people visit public places, others don’t rush to cancel the security measures. The only thing that seems to unite us is the awesome spring, no matter what… But wait, we still have online activities — though recently having become commonplace, digital events keep on surprising us by their even more complex and engaging content. And there is something that can be done right away — e.g. enjoying brand new gorgeous artworks by famous artists, listening to podcasts with their participation, getting back in time, exploring fashion collections, and other things. Learn more about the news, events & opportunities of the week below.

Olafur Eliasson launches a new AR project

During COVID-19 quarantine artist Olafur Eliasson has released two digital projects: the first one, “Earth Perspectives” series of artworks was introduced in April as a means of celebrating the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. The recent work Wunderkammer has been launched in conjunction with digital art app Acute Art. The augmented reality project features a collection of 10 sculptures including a sun, a raincloud, and the Northern Lights that can be virtually placed around users’ homes — all of them available for free through the Acute Art app. 

Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson is world famous for using natural elements in his works, integrating them as an immersive installation into some public spaces and galleries. Probably, the most well-known work by EliassonThe Weather Project was first released at the Turbine Hall of Tate Modern in 2003. The visitors of the exhibition could see a huge sun rising, transforming the entire space of the Turbine Hall. However, apart from the mesmerizing light installation, it was the audience who contributed to the process of making art — by contemplating the sun and experiencing the environment. 

Olafur Eliasson: “I always try to make work that activates the viewer to be a co-producer of our shared reality”.

The weather project, 2003

The weather project, 2003

The weather project, 2003

1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair available online

The 1-54 New York 2020 edition of the Contemporary African Art Fair has been postponed, however, thanks to Artsy, visitors can get acquainted with the artworks presented digitally. Until May 31 you are welcome to access the page of the Fair on artsy.net. 180 paintings, 192 fine-art photographs as well as the “Works on Paper” and “Cultural Commentary” categories are waiting for your exploration.

The leading international art fair dedicated to contemporary African art was founded by the Moroccan entrepreneur Touria El Glaoui in 2013. Ever since the fair has been held annually in London, while New York edition appeared in 2015 and Marrakech in 2018. Why 1-54? Simple, there are 54 countries constituting the African continent — whose brightest representatives from the field of art are on display within the innovative platform. The soonest offline edition will take place in the British capital, from October 8—11 with a VIP Preview on October 7. See you at Somerset House at the 1-54 London very soon (meanwhile enjoying the option provided by Artsy).

Contemporary African Art Fair

Contemporary African Art Fair

Contemporary African Art Fair

Yohji Yamamoto remembers his past

The new capsule series by Yohji YamamotoReplica SS96 is meant to revive the brand men’s spring-summer 1996 collection. The Replica line includes four models of jackets with lapels, four pairs of trousers and three shirts that resemble their counterparts from 1996 a lot. “Replica SS96” will be available in Aoyama shop in Tokyo from May 30. The estimated price for one item is between $400 USD and $2,500 USD.

The Japanese designer Yohji Yamamoto gained much fame in the 1980s as an advocate for deconstructivism from the world of haute couture, an avant-garde artist and a rule-breaker. Yohji Yamamoto caught the vibe of the upcoming social and cultural changes, suggesting that women could dress the way men do — relaxed, simple, and yet elegant. His favorite colour has always been black and generally it’s dark basic tones that constitute the brand’s palette. The designer says, he doesn’t really believe in future, but he enjoys retrospecting. That might be a good explanation for his recent decision to create “Replica SS96” series. 

Yohji Yamamoto: “Start copying what you love. Copy copy copy copy. At the end of the copy you will find yourself.

“Replica SS96” Line by Yohji Yamamoto

“Replica SS96” Line by Yohji Yamamoto

“Replica SS96” Line by Yohji Yamamoto

“En Route to New Orleans” by William Eggleston sold for €38,000

The dreamy photo work depicting someone sitting on the plane by the window with a drink, shining under sun was made by the American photographer William Eggleston in 1971. Recently “En Route to New Orleans” has been sold at the auction by OstLicht Gallery (Vienna) at a price of €38,000. It’s a much higher rate than estimated, however, it’s not the limit. Christie’s reports that Los Alamos portfolio by Eggleston (1965-74) was sold for $1,022,500 USD at the auction on October 13, 2008 in New York. 

William Eggleston is famous for having legitimized color photography as a fine art form. Maintaining his curiosity for reality fixing, he implemented the dry language of documentary photography into the genre of the future. Photographs by William Eggleston didn’t win recognition at once, so ridiculously mundane they would appear to the artist’s contemporaries. However, looking at the price of his works today, one might guess that Eggleston managed to leave a mark in the history of photography.  

Untitled (1970). From Dust Bells, Volume II (1965-1974)

Los Alamos portfolio by William Eggleston (1965—1974)

Untitled by William Eggleston (1983-1986)

Listening to Marina Abramovic in the podcast by the Art Newspaper 

The Week in Art podcast brought by the Art Newspaper in association with Christie’s comes out each Friday and tackles the most recent issues of the field. Last time there was a really special release featuring the interview with Marina Abramovic. The topic sounded like: what’s the future of performance in the post-pandemic art world? Considering the general situation with epidemic and specificity of this kind of art (which frequently rests on experiencing the context) it feels so true to listen to the grandmother of performance art, learning about her perspectives on the future.

COVID-19 resources for photographers by LensCulture

And now bonus for photography-lovers! LensCulture editors curated a “list of initiatives, ideas and resources” for all those who can’t imagine their lives without photography — both professionals and amateurs. You can choose from competitions, festivals, educational opportunities, grants, inspirational podcasts and blogs and many other things. The list will be updated weekly. By the way, suggestions and additions from the readers are widely welcomed. Just get your camera ready 🙂

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