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Artist In Focus: Janik Gensheimer

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Artist In Focus: Janik Gensheimer

How did you get into photography? 

For a school project I started to dig into abstract photography. I got all the books I could get my hands on from the library and spent all summer learning as much as I could about it. In autumn I tried all kinds of abstract photography experiements in my black-out room.

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Can you tell us about the process of making your work? 

First of all it needs a great idea. No matter if it’s for a personal project or a job with certain requirements, the idea and the concept are the most important part for a coherent series.

My aim is to implement each job in a way that it’s good enough to make it into my portfolio. I want to create photographs that touch the viewer and create emotions. This cannot be done only through great execution. The content of the picture has to be compelling, has to be new, and polarizing. My photograph is a good one when it makes the viewer pause and provokes a reaction. This is what I’m going for in every photograph I create.

When it comes to architecutal photography the process is a bit simpler. The preparation is a detailed analysis of the building and the location. I then decide on which time of day I have to where and in what weather conditions. Everything else is then created during the process of photography. I try to get a feel for the architect’s idea and bring the three-dimensionality into the two-dimensionality of photography through my clear and simple style. To me, the highest art in photography is to find a clear, unbiased perspective, in which I don’t influence (architectual photography is documentation) while still creating emotions.

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Do you have a favourite photograph or painting, which inspires you?

Untitled, 1992
Adam Fuss

Which photographer  of the past would you most like to meet? 

Man Ray

Have you ever had a moment when you questioned your career entirely? 

thankfully not.  I’ve always known that that’s gonna be my path and my passion.

What advice would you give to a young artist following in your steps?

My own path to being an artist is long from finished. Instead, I’d like to answer this question in regards to a path to photography.

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I think it is important to take enough time to figure out what kind of photographer and artist you want to be.
There are a milion possibilities, but if you want to be successful and be able to give it all you’ve got, you should be in it with your head and your heart, and love what you do.
A good, solid training is the first step on this road. Ask yourself where you can get the best training for what you want, regardless of the degree that comes with that training. For some people a regular apprenticeship with a good photographer might be a better fit than a university programme. Keep in mind that it requires a high quality of your educational insitution that also aligns with your own interests.
Once you’ve finished your training assist, assist, assist. There is no better way to gain precious experience of what your day-to-day life as a photographer is going to be like. Mistakes aren’t as grave and you’re starting to build a network that might pay off down the road. Never forget being a photographer is also being a business (wo)man. You’ll need to know how to run a business, because being a good photographer won’t help you to land any jobs.

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Instagram Janik Gensheimer: @janik__g
www.janikgensheimer.de

Lyubov Lukashenko „color“

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COLOR

Photo & Idea: Lyubov Lukashenko @lukashenko_l;
Style: Yelyzaveta Telesheva @domashnyaya_li;
Make-up artists: Yuliya Pavlyuk @yuliya_pavliuk, Anastasiia Fedotova @honey.melon, Valeriia
Engels @engels_valeria;
Hair stylists: Anna Arventi @arventi_anna, Dary Ganzha @dary_ganzha, Anastasiia Fedotova
@honey.melon;
Models: Yurii Agafonov @schroedinger.beard, Demyd Briukhanov @demyd_briukhanov, Anastasia
Vinnik @vvvv_vorona, Anastasia Belousova @st.cgrttx, Valeriia Tishchenko @camerist_ka,
Aleksandra Prognimak @aleksandra.prognimak, Iryna Brovchenko @irina._.balerina, Tatyana
Yevlanova @tatyana_yevlanova, Anastasia Yarzhemskaya @schakatin, Sofia Chernukha
@ss0ne4ka, Nataliia Leschenko @unicornitaa, Oleksandra Ilarionova @alaaasska;
Video: Danil Karev @dakarstudio;
with the support of the studios Beauty Queen @beauty.queen.studio & Vesna
@vesna_1992_kharkov;
Location: Mental Complex @mental_complex_studio

Gosia Błasiak „all about her skin“

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ALL ABOUT HER SKIN

Model Katalina Candezano Arango @katalina_candezano from Generation Models @generation.models
Photographed & Art Directed by Gosia Błasiak @m.blasiak
MUAH Varvara Dediukhina @varvarad
Both artist represented by Magenta Represents @magentareps
Retouch by Maryna Lasevich @amedehi_retouch
Assistant & backstage Inga Cara @ingacaraphoto
Special thanks to Nicholas Lapité @nlapite
Wardrobe Swimwear by allSisters @allsisters_official

Sveta Maximova „aurora borealis“

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AURORA BOREALIS

Photographer and Art Director – Sveta Maximova @thesvetamaximova
Stylists – Gina Bryzgalova @ginabryzgalova, Yana Usanova @wheres.joanna
Producer – Artemy Chukrov @artemychukrov
Style Assistant – Alina Krutakova @krutakova_
Set Design – Sveta Maximova @thesvetamaximova
Make-Up and Hair – Aina Adamova @mua_ainora
Assistants – Alice Suleimanova @alice_suul, Alexandra Chizhova @chizzhik
Model – Roxolana Dambaeva @rrroxolana @newnowagency
Minerals – Minerals Shop @minerals_shop  www.minerals-shop.ru
Special thanks to Yana Nikolaeva @ynnklv

Blouse – Irina Khakhileva @takto_ya_zmeya; Top – Mihaeli Design @mihaelidesign; Accessories – Ampersand @ampersand.ring; Mineral Weather @mineralweather; Blouse – Irina Khakhileva @takto_ya_zmeya; Skirt and hat – Sasha Shutkina @sashashutkina; Shoes – Zara

Dress – Muus @muus.brand; Vest – Onoma @onoma.clth; Coat – O5O @o5o.moscow; Pants – Mihaeli Design @mihaelidesign; Earrings – Ampersand @ampersand.rings

Blouse – Irina Khakhileva @takto_ya_zmeya; Skirt and hat – Sasha Shutkina @sashashutkina; Shoes – Zara

Top – Sasha Shutkina @sashashutkina; Corset – Alisa Kuzembaeva @alisakuzembaeva; Pants – Mihaeli Design @mihaelidesign; Dress – Nina Veresova @nina_lii; Shoes – Zara; Accessories – Ampersand @ampersand.ring; Mineral Weather @mineralweather

Blouse – O5O @o5o.moscow; Dress – Onoma @onoma.clth; Earrings – Ampersand @ampersand.rings; Coat – O5O @o5o.moscow; Pants – Mihaeli Design @mihaelidesign; Earrings – Ampersand @ampersand.rings

Dress – Muus @muus.brand; Vest – Onoma @onoma.clth; Blouse – Irina Khakhileva @takto_ya_zmeya; Top – Mihaeli Design @mihaelidesign; Pants – Muus @muus.brand; Shoes – Zara

Pants – Mihaeli Design @mihaelidesign; Accessories – Ampersand @ampersand.ring

Art Digest: February 15—21

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Julia Kryshevich

Art Digest: February 15—21

Whew, New York Fashion Week has just ended, taking place in the first part of the week. I mean, it was an exciting, at some point rather unexpected show, so now it’s time to process the impressions. While an extensive review of the event is about to come up, we can already discuss some of its striking moments: e.g. how Anna Sui designers referred to Jane Birkin’s character from the 1968 movie in the brand’s Fall Winter 2021 collection. However, the current episode is not only about the NYFW 2021, but also some other news from the battlefield of fashion, arts, and, suddenly, food packaging design! The latter topic is well-known to most of us beginning from childhood, thus, I just couldn’t pass by… So welcome aboard, we’re about to take off!

Big Mac ® packaging by Pearlfisher. Courtesy of Pearlfisher

‘Innate joy of the McDonald’s’ in a new packaging designed by Pearlfisher 

I’m sure everyone knows this feeling. You have a long drive in a car with your sweetheart or family members. Suddenly you see an inviting red sign with a yellow letter M on it on the back of the road… Hesitation fades away, McDonalds is always a good idea! When you drive up to a food pick up window, what would you choose? Most probably, a Big Mac®? Well, since you’re a fish lover, you might take a Fillet-O-Fish®, and cheese enthusiasts will opt for the Cheeseburger®. Regardless of the country, most of us are used to roughly the same design of the packaging of our favorite McDonalds snacks. Yet from now on, things are getting different. 

Fast food chain McDonalds has briefed the branding agency Pearlfisher to create a new design for its food packaging. The main goal for the designers was to reflect McDonald’s‘ ‘playful point-of-view’ and its ‘innate joy’, Hamish Campbell, executive creative director at Pearlfisher shares. Graphics unveiled by the branding agency feature simple, recognizable, and facetious packaging items, each of them speaking for itself: e.g. the white wrapper of the EggMcMuffin® has a yellow ‘yolk’ on it, while the Quarter Pounder® box is covered with the stripes of ‘grilled cheese’ and ‘beef’. However, it’s the conical red packaging of the McDonalds French Fries® that undergoes no changes (perhaps they couldn’t think of anything better yet). To sum things up, the new McDonalds packaging design by Pearlfisher bribes with its witty simplicity, but shall it fully replace the existing and already fancied one? Well, time will show. 

New packaging design for McDonalds by Pearlfisher. Courtesy of Pearlfisher

In a Barbie world: designer Richard Quinn takes a doll to showcase his new collection 

Aged 31, London-based fashion designer Richard Quinn has already gained favor of such famous fashionistas as Queen Elisabeth II and singer Lady Gaga. Actually, why wouldn’t he? Apart from having incorporated technical-design smarts into his outfits, along with his signature wallpaper prints, Quinn also cares about the message: for instance, in his latest collections the designer has touched upon the topic of Brexit chaos, sharing his bold and positive ‘I-want-it-to-be-London-centric’ outlook. This time, however, Richard Quinn demonstrates a kind of a more laid-back attitude, testing a look from his Fall 2021 collection… on a Barbie doll! The collection is human-sized, by the way. 

‘If we were able to show this season, Barbie would be our woman of choice to open the show,’ Mr. Quinn explains in a statement. Okay, the point taken: since couturiers can’t come up with physical fashion shows yet, why not think about extraordinary ways of presenting new collections? A generously embellished gown based on a crinoline the Barbie mannequin wears was hand-crafted by Quinn’s atelier, #nooutsourcing. All in all, it took the tailors 10 days to complete the marvelous look. By the way, Richard Quinn x Barbie collaboration is a part of London Fashion Week unfolding these days. Check her official Instagram account, @barbiestyle to explore some other baby-doll looks. 

Richard Quinn Fall 2020 Ready-To-Wear collection. Photo_ Carlo Scarpato

A gown from Richard Quinn Fall 2021 collection, showcased on a Barbie doll. Courtesy of Richard Quinn_

Richard Quinn Fall 2020 Ready-To-Wear collection. Photo_ Carlo Scarpato

A bit of Jane Birkin in Anna Sui Fall Winter 2021 collection 

You remember that? Psychedelic looks in Anna Sui Fall Winter 2021 presentation broadcasted at the latest New York Fashion Week. Just in case you’ve missed it, there is a video below. But let me finish my thought. Couturier Anna Sui like no one knows that the devil is in the details, this rule perfectly works for the field of fashion, even if the collection items seem to be speaking for themselves.

That’s what we see in her Fall Winter 2021 campaign: titled ‘Phantasmadelic’, the collection features such boho outfits as faux-fur leopard coats, rhythmically-patterned tees and shirts, easy dresses embellished with ruching and sequins. The looks are topped with tender yet artistic makeup, inspired by the 1968 film ‘Wonderwall’. Performed by the incredible Jane Birkin, the main character, quite a typical swinging 60s fashion model is in the focus of her neighbor’s attention, who is a conventional scientist and has a nose for extraordinary, ‘beyond-one’s-self-control’ effects and their carriers. Yes, exactly, the movie is about the vibrant and psychedelic world of the artistic bohemia at that time, so you can imagine it’s rich visual aesthetics. Interesting enough, Jane Birkin’s character is called Penny Lane, just like the famous song by the Beatles, and what’s more, music for ‘Wonderwall’ was produced by George Harrison, the quartet’s lead guitarist. The carrying away sound, Jane’s chic cut-crease eye makeup and her dreamy outfits, that’s what makes the work a perfect source for inspiration. But you know, seeing is believing, so after getting enough of Anna Sui Fall Winter 2021 presentation, you might want to check out the film.

‘Neon Structure’ by Lucio Fontana to grace Guggenheim Bilbao’s atrium 

I bet the first work by Lucio Fontana that may come to your mind will be something from his Concetto Spaziale series or paintings with slots. It’s no wonder, while Fontana is widely known as the founder of Spatialism, an art movement, which proclaims synthesizing different mediums like color, sound, and space into a new type of an artistic expression. Concetto Spaziale is a really important part of the painter’s oeuvre, but not the only one. That’s what Guggenheim Bilbao might have thought about while arranging Fontana’s installation in the museum’s atrium, which, for its part, will be embellished by the artwork during the next three years. 

The light installation ‘Neon Structure’ by Lucio Fontana dates back to 1951, the year when the Ninth Milan Triennial themed Goods — Standards’ took place. Creating his work for the Triennial, the famous artist partially referred to the idea of light drawings introduced by his equally famous colleague Pablo Picasso a few years earlier, yet Fontana believed in the authenticity of his pet project. Meanwhile critics of the mid 20th century couldn’t fully appreciate the artist’s multifunctional concept, Lucio Fontana annoyingly noted in his statement: ‘[It] is not a lasso, an arabesque, nor a piece of spaghetti… it is the beginning of a new expression’. From now on, a wonderful piece of the luminous spaghetti (sorry, Lucio) will grace the atrium of Guggenheim Bilbao, just like it was at the Ninth Milan Triennial, at the Palazzo dell’Arte 70 years ago. 

Artist Pablo Picasso with his work ‘Light Drawing’ (1949). Photo_ Getty Images

Artist Lucio Fontana working upon his Spatial Concept painting. Photo_ Getty Images

‘Neon Structure’ by Lucio Fontana at the Palazzo del Arte, Milan (1951). Courtesy_ Photo Archive Fondazione La Triennale de Milano

On the cover: Jane Birkin in ‘Wonderwall’, 1968. Photo: Pinterest

Exclusive interview with Nadine Dinter, director of an Art PR agency in Berlin

By /ART/, /BLOG/, /INTERVIEW

photo: Steven Kohlstock

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I r e n  R u s s o

Exclusive interview with Nadine Dinter, director of an Art PR agency in Berlin

Can you tell us about your background in the arts, and how you ended up working as an independent PR agency specialising in photography and also as an art collector?

As long as I can remember, I have loved the arts. As a child, you would always see me with a piece of paper and a crayon; later I copied famous works like those by Franz Marc or visions of Venice. While I was doing my A-levels in art, I went to every museum show possible. After making my first steps in the business world, I moved to New York as I wanted to add some experience to my first two courses of study. In the summer of 2001, I enrolled at NYU to study art administration. I also got an internship at the renowned non-profit space White Columns, and immersed myself in the local art scene. Experiencing art and working with professionals really helped me to navigate through the overwhelming New York art scene.

I strongly believe that doing and creating have always been more valuable for me than just reading and listening. Theorie vs. Praxis, as we say in German. Internships and project experiences helped me find the kind of work I wanted to do. After New York came an internship at Boris Abel Kunst, then work at C/O Berlin, followed by a job at Asperger Gallery, then one at Alexander Ochs Berlin/Beijing. In 2006, I was ready to strike out on my own and founded my PR agency. As a lover of photography and avid photographer myself – this quickly became the focus my activities: promoting photography exhibitions for galleries, museums, and artists. During the early years, I often accepted art pieces as part of my payment; later, I bought art that “spoke to me” – at art fairs, during studio visits, even at flea markets. I have also received work from artists as a token of appreciation for my services. So you could say that art collecting came with the job, or is a pleasant side effect of my PR work.

Photographer Olaf Heine, Press Officer Nadine Dinter and model Maik Eichhorn, Galerie IMMAGIS, 2018, Photo: Michael Tinnefeld

What is your earliest memory of photography art, and what led you to start collecting it and promoting it?

Photography has always been a passion of mine. As a teen I started taking pictures using an old Praktica I inherited from my grandfather, and I loved visiting the few photography galleries that were around in the nineties in Berlin. Rare works at Kicken gallery in Berlin-Mitte, high-fashion photographs at CAMERA WORK in Charlottenburg, as well as the fantastic Helmut Newton retrospective in 2000 at Neue Nationalgalerie are three highly memorable shows from the early years.

The reason I started collecting and promoting art came from my strong desire – or even need – to have art in my private and professional life. And photography, with its exciting history, captivating works and protagonists, plus my own photographic work, seemed to be the perfect medium to build the rest of my life on. The rest is history…

How would you describe yourself as a photography PR specialist?

24/7, passionate, professional, open, ambitious, well-connected, a healthy mix of outgoing and discreet, eager to constantly learn about the classics while discovering the work of new photographers. My motto: Consult, communicate, connect.

Together with the Hilton Brothers Paul Solberg (left) and Christopher Makos (right), Waldorf Astoria Hotel Berlin, 2016, Photo: Dietmar Bührer

What is the main motivation behind your work?

The central aim of my work is to create maximum exposure and media attention for the projects I am promoting. This means international press articles, well-orchestrated press events and openings, and the many visitors activated to come and view the gallery exhibition, museum show, or festival. Personally, I love the feeling of being immersed in the art experience. It’s also immensely rewarding to be at an opening and to see the happy faces of the client, the artists, and the visitors.

What are the three main qualities an art consultant must have?

Willpower, patience, and connectivity.

What are some dos and don’ts artists should know when working with a consultant?  

Dos: If you decide you want support, then be open, cooperative, and willing to accept advice you might not like at first.

Have a clear vision of what you want, or try to express the essence of your goals as clearly as possible, so that the consultant can pick up on it and build your personalized strategy.

Don’t: Don’t overestimate yourself but also don’t underestimate yourself. Be ready to let go of old habits and to let in fresh perspectives, new ideas, and unusual approaches.

With star photographers Inez & Vinoodh and curator + director of the Helmut Newton Foundation, Matthias Harder, HNF Berlin 2019

During the opening at the Deichtorhallen, with photographer Miron Zownir (left) and his gallerist Bene Taschen (right), Hamburg 2016

 

As a PR and art consultant, how have you built up your wide network of artists and clients? How has this changed since COVID-19? 

Part of my work is visiting major photography events, such as les Rencontres d’Arles and Paris Photo, but above all, the photography-related events here in Berlin. This is where you see the artists, clients, and curators you already know but also where you get to know new people in the scene, by being introduced to them or by introducing yourself. Going to openings shows their respect, and signals that you, too, are an active part of the scene. Plus you can see the works in person: for me, a digital representation is no match for a live experience.

Since COVID-19, the scene, the personal encounters, and the whole feeling of togetherness have been hit incredibly hard. Otherwise simple acts of meeting in person to talk about art and life, all the little human interactions, not to mention travel – these have all been put on hold. On top of that are the financial woes that have come with the closing of the art spaces.

What is the most recent work of art you added to your personal collection and why?

A beautiful black and white portrait of Alfred Hitchcock, taken in 1970 by Greg Gorman. On the one hand, I adore b/w portraits, and on the other hand, I love Hitchcock’s movies. So two passions are combined in one photograph.

With jazz musician + photographer Till Brönner and photographer Tom Lemke, Berlin 2016, Photo: Steven Kohlstock

Has digitalization changed the way you collect art?

Not really. Although I do read market reports, which inform on what is being auctioned or sold digitally, I am a classic collector who loves to stand in front of an artwork, to get a better sense of its materiality, feel its power; the live experience is what stirs my desire to buy the work.

Where is the future of the art market headed?

This year and last have proven that there are other effective means to show and promote art than “just” exhibitions and fairs. It’s great that novel ways of displaying and selling art are being developed and implemented. But at the same time, the art market seems to be shifting in favor of wealthy, blue chip galleries – at the expense of the diversity of the art scene, which consists of big AND small galleries, institutions and non-profits, temporary project spaces, artist initiatives, and so on. I sincerely hope that the art scene will start recovering soon, and that it will be able to regain its previous energy.

Top three art destinations

Helmut Newton Foundation, Berlin
Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin
Camera Work, Berlin

Three inspiring artists to watch

Marie Tomanova
Armin Dietrich
Chloé Jafé

Opening of Berlin Photo Week, with Thomas Kretschmann, Richard Kruspe and Olaf Heine, Chaussee 36, Berlin 2019, Photo: Christian Behring

Instagram Nadine Dinter PR @nadine_dinter
Website: dinter-pr.de

Art Digest: February 08—14

By /ART/, /BLOG/, /NEWS/
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Julia Kryshevich

Art Digest: February 08—14

It’s beautiful that this week has been topped by St. Valentine’s day. However, what’s even more exciting, the long-awaited New York Fashion Week Fall/Winter 2021 (digital — out of options so far) has just taken off these days. Get ready to discover PH extensive review of the collections very soon, meanwhile we can vanish into the foretaste together with Pantone Colour Institute, which knows something about the upcoming event… Actually, NYFW might come as a fresh breath for all us mainly tracking European fashion, and that’s what makes it important. Yet we’re still into Italian-French sort of things, hearing the news about the local brands and designers with gusto. So, it’s time we load up with some knowledge of trends, big names from the world of vogue, and just our own expectations to break into the most fashionable days of the season!

F A S H I O N 

Mischievous Leprechaun and fervent Fuchsia: Pantone forecasts the NYFW color palette 

Pantone Color Institute keeps on tirelessly setting the world color trends, all the more now, in the precarious times of the pandemic. Most of us were somewhat surprised to find out the new shade of red inspired by periods last autumn, yet the Institute seems to be capable of far more courageous and independent statements. Pantone has defined the color palette for the upcoming New York Fashion Week Fall/Winter 2021, and the salient point here is: all shades chosen should be fused together in any combination, though, no doubt, they can stand on their own at the will of the owner.

‘We can’t say that people have more time to get creative, because if you’re working at home, time is still an issue. Nevertheless, you try to get creative because of the boredom, and the sameness that’s around you. That can be reflected in the clothing that you’re wearing,’ explains Leatrice Eiseman, Pantone Color Institute executive director.

The choice of the NYFW colors has been driven by the pesky pandemic ‘sit-at-home-get-on-Zoom’ lifestyle, or rather exhaustion from that. The Institute experts call on awakening our imagination and succumbing to experiments, the bolder, the better. By the way, the latter can be said of the shades, each of them bursting with joie de vivre and vigour. Mykonos Blue, ‘very crisp and refreshing’, kind of washes us over with pure ocean waves, while the eye-opening Illuminating yellow (which, by the way, has been appointed Pantone’s 2021 Color of the Year, together with Ultimate Gray) powers with boundless optimism. The pulsing Fuchsia Fedora sounds like an invitation to the Rio Carnival and Leprechaun makes one think either of the juicy green Amazonian rainforests or Irish folklore. Pale Rosette is also in the play: a ‘baby blanket color’, it will be there to wrap you up, when the world around whirls and howls impossibly. Among the colors in the palette there are also Adobe, Rhodonite, Spring Lake, Coconut Cream, Soybean and etc. Don’t put off to discover them all! 

The 24-year-old Charles de Vilmorin to become Rochas creative director 

Becoming a brand’s creative director at 24? A recent graduate of La Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne, Charles de Vilmorin proves it’s possible. It’s Rochas, the Paris-based haute couture maison founded in the far 1925, that decided to offer the 24-year-old de Vilmorin a top position in the company. The aspiring designer expressed himself in a loud voice while presenting his Couture SS 2021 collection in January and, thus, won the favor of the High Fashion Maitre, Jean-Charles de Castelbajac himself. Yet Charles de Vilmorin doesn’t even think of abandoning his own label — the designer plans to keep developing his pet project parallel to assuming his duties at Rochas

Actually, it’s not that simple — I mean, regarding de Vilmorin’s appointment. The fashion designer’s great-aunt Louise de Vilmorin was a heiress and a friend of Hélène Rochas, the wife of the founder of the maison, Marcel Rochas. So, it would be correct to say that Charles’ provenance played a big role in the case as well as his introduction to the brand’s aesthetics. ‘Rochas represents for me a real charm, <…> a symbol of purity and elegance, of freshness. Rochas DNA’s and my own will be able to combine to continue writing this beautiful Rochas story,’ Charles de Vilmorin excitedly shares. Well, a brand like Rochas, (which, in the PH humble opinion is capable of embodying the spirit of a most unfathomable archetype like that of Magician) deserves having such a passionate, bright lead as de Vilmorin. Good luck and endless inspiration to him! 

Saga of the knights: meet Celine Homme Winter 2021 show 

Still on the subject of young up-and-comers in the fashion industry, let’s glance at Hedi Slimane, Celine’s creative and image director. Slimane has covered the position since 2018, having previously worked for Dior Homme and Yves Saint Laurent. Yet it’s not the age of the Celine current CD (Hedi Slimane is 52, by the way, which doesn’t sound that tender), but rather his photographic background that makes his case so interesting. For more than two years now Slimane has been coming up with unusual ideas for the Maison, and here’s what he has concocted for the Homme Winter 2021 collection.  

Instead of the real fashion show, a short film ‘Teen Knight Poem’ has been produced for the new men’s collection. The title just perfectly conveys the plot and the spirit of the narrative: young boys with shaggy hair and waving flags in their hands ride horses to an ivory castle. No, they don’t want to set Goldilocks free, but rather intend to stroll across the castle turrets on the soundtrack ‚Time Slip‘ performed by The Loom. ‘Teen Knight Poem’ sings a sort of gothic, bellicose romance, which might be described as puritanic as well. Rebellious leather jackets, rough metals, and sequins frayed pants are counterbalanced by starched collars, loose knitted jumpers, and plaid shirts put under the flapping capes. It seems like Hedi Slimane drew inspiration from the new generation of fashion lovers, unshackled and focused at once. What’s also good, the looks from the ‘Teen Knight Poem’ Homme FW 2021 collection are perfectly wearable in day-to-day life. It’s up to you whether to chase windmills or tackle more serious issues in such an outfit — it’s attention grabbing anyway. 

All shades of pink: That’s how SS 2021 collections smell like

Journalists from the world’s no.1 fashion bulletin Vogue have recently come up with some forecasts on 2021 color trends. Vogue experts have examined the Spring/Summer collections by the leading fashion brands and… it’s the color pink that will be running the show during the next 6 months, they say. Should they have viewed the catwalk through the rose-tinted glasses, no one knows, but the outlook sounds rather sweet and soothing — so much haunted by the reality we might feel today. So the phantasy world is waiting for all fashionistas to slide therein right now. 

Yet the couturiers choose different ways of falling into a dreamiest shade in the upcoming season. For example, Bottega Veneta seeks no compromise while creating a total pink look with a short-sleeved sweatshirt, pants, sandals, sunglasses, and other accessories, all pale mauve. Brands like Alexander McQueen, Prada, and Proenza Schouler confine themselves just to adding color rose to the principal item of the outfit, be it a pantsuit or a tutu dress. Feel like an escapist? Then opt for Dolce Gabbana baby pink-colored gowns. If you rather prefer passion and energy, pay close attention to SS 2021 collections by the likes of Valentino, Stella McCartney, and Balmain with their versions of fluorescent pink

S O C I A L   A C T I V I S M 

FKA Twigs collaborates with Getty Images to support Black history narrative 

In case you are not exactly sure, FKA Twigs is an English singer and actress. Born Tahliah Debrett Barnett, she started her performing career at the age of 17, dancing at the backup in music videos by some celebrities. Her pseudonym was born as someone called her Twigs for the way her joints cracked. However, since there already was a collective called The Twigs, the singer decided to add the FKA (first known as) abbreviation to her name, that’s how it was stuck.

If you want to discover FKA Twigs’ talent, check her LP1, Melissa, and Magdalena albums or what’s fresh. Back on point, the artist has recently engaged into social collaboration, aiming at supporting black people and paying tribute to their history. Her partner in crime this time is visual media company Getty Images, and as you may guess the collaboration focuses on visual content, in particular, disclosing it. The company will donate images related to Black history from the world’s largest archive for non-commercial use, thus, encouraging educational, research, and mentoring initiatives on the topic. ‘We were discussing how powerful it would be to make this content available to Black creators and educators – enabling us to put these pieces together and make our history accessible for generations to come,’ FKA Twigs told the press. The collaboration will be launched this year, further details of the project might be released in the next few months. 

On the cover: Celine Hommes‘ Fall/Winter 2021 collection. Courtesy of Celine