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Mai 2020

Art Digest: May 25-31

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Julia Kryshevich

Art Digest: May 25—31

Meanwhile, it’s the last week of spring. What kind of package we have to step into summer? Here is a quick overview of the major events that either have happened recently or will pleasantly surprise us very soon.

Opportunities

All forms of photography are wanted at the CE Center

The Southeast Center for Photography (South Carolina, US) invites photographers of different skill levels and locations to join the

Light exhibition which will take place from August 7 till August 29, 2020. The organizers honor light and shadow as the foundation of photography since the beginning and suggest that applicants show their best version of light. About 35—40 images will be selected by jurors and hung in the main gallery space of the SE Center for a month. If your work is sold during the show, you will receive 60% of the sale price. There is a participation fee and some additional costs may arise, see the SE Center website for more details.

Deadline for submissions: June 7, 2020
Selections Announced: June 22, 2020

Art Fairs

Stay online: Art Paris Digital by Artsy and Art Paris Live are launched

Yes, we all probably know that the 22nd edition of Art Paris couldn’t take place from April 2—5 at the Grand Palais as intended. However, now we have a perfect way out. The previously mentioned Artsy acts as a digital venue for the Fair, whereas Art Paris Live provides an option for visitors to take a virtual tour of the exhibition spaces presented. The opening of Art Paris Digital was on May 27 — a day earlier the Fair Director Guillaume Piens presented the new edition on Instagram. So, before June 20 you have an opportunity to explore the artworks digitally (probably using the specially prepared personal guide which can be downloaded for IPhone). In case you really miss the sense of the place, its’ energy and odour, the next full-fledged edition is within reach — the announced dates are 7—11 April 2021.

Although moved online, the 2020 edition of Art Paris has in no account been cut back. 150 galleries from different countries participating, apart from the usual General Sector, Solo Show, and Promises two new aspiring sections have arisen, which are French Art Scene and Southern Stars: An Exploration of the Iberian Peninsula. For the former curator and publisher Gaël Charbau has selected 22 local artists narrating the most amazing and controversial stories through the artistic means. The latter is dedicated to the cultural identity and diversity of the place that have been discovered by the Iberian masters carefully chosen by independent Spanish curator Carolina Grau.

Christine Mathieu. La Robe de Mademoissele Kikuji, 2011

Du Zhenjun. Babel Tower- the wind, 2010

Edouard Taufenbach. Impression nu de dos, 2018

Exhibition openings:

Reopening of the world’s leading museums coming soon

Quite a long time museums all over the world have been closed, albeit staying in touch with its’ visitors via social networks and other digital wonders. However, it seems that those times are slowly running out (not in the meaning that online got sucked into oblivion, of course). In contrast, some major art institutions in Europe, Asia, and US begin to open their doors — quite carefully, one might say. Among the precaution procedures there are responsibilities for visitors to wear masks and keep social distance, while museums themselves are obliged to sell timed tickets and install hand sanitising stations. For instance, Vienna Albertina and Albertina Modern and Picasso Museum in Malaga open this week. Next week Parisians will be able to visit Monet Museum and those who either stay or reside in Amsterdam can choose between Rijksmuseum, Stedelijk and Van Gogh Museum. More information about the opening dates is available via the above link.

‘Selected Works 1990-2020’ by Glen Luchford available on Art Partner’s website

If you’re into fashion photography or particularly enjoy the oeuvre of British photographer Glen Luchford, than we have some good news for you. A big online exhibition by the artist called Selected Works 1990-2020 will be hosted on the website of Art Partner — the world’s leading artist management agency and production company. The 30 years of Luchford’s creative career are presented through the series of his most important works, including campaign images for Gucci and shots of celebrities for top glossies, such as Harper’s Bazaar and Vogue. The project runs until June 30, 2020. Enjoy the high quality virtual walk-through of the exhibition!

Just what is it that makes the figure of Glen Luchford so appealing for the history of fine art and fashion photography? First, the artist was just 20, when he started working for The Face Magazine. Four years later he signed with the New York-based Art + Commerce agency and that was a beginning for his further fruitful collaboration with some giants from the world of fashion. Glen Luchford shot for different editions of Vogue and Vanity Fair, thus winning attention of haute couture fashion brands, such as Lanvin, Yves Saint Laurent, Miu Miu, Chloe, Prada, and Calvin Klein, which soon became his advertising clients. However, the most successful collaboration was the one with Gucci (a few images from the Gucci fashion campaigns by Luchford can be found at the new exhibition). Glen Luchford was one of the first photographers to work together with Kate Moss and use cinematic lighting a lot during the shoot. His fascination with cinema finally turned into film direction — the artist directed the film Here to Where in 2001. Apart from this, Glen Luchford published 5 books about photography and can boast (if he ever does) of having his artworks in the collections of the world’s leading museums.

Something new & exciting:

The 10th Bucharest Biennale will be curated by Jarvis (which is an AI program)

Can you imagine the world without any art curators — their duties being performed by artificial intelligence? Well, the future seems to be coming very soon. In 2022 the Bucharest Biennale will be curated by an artificial intelligence program called Jarvis, which was named so after the comics’ character from IRON MAN and may be deciphered as just a rather very intelligent system. Developed by the Vienna-based studio Spinnwerk, the program is supposed to generate short texts as a concept and select artists for the biennal relying on the information it has. The venue of the 10th Bucharest Biennale will be the Spinnwerk VR gallery, which is to be launched in October this year. If you’re going to have your own VR headset in two years time, you’ll be able to enjoy viewing the Biennale from home; if not, organizers hope for the installment of VR booths in Bucharest and Vienna open to the public. Definitely, the world will never be the same…

The Bucharest Biennale was launched by the non-profit cultural organization Artphoto asc. in 2005. The mission of the biennal is to disseminate cultural and artistic practices, linking those with social development, both in the local and global contexts. This year the 9th edition of the Biennale is to take place (presumably, it will be launched online on June 28, as COVID-19 has shifted the plans). The appointed curator is art historian, writer, and Dean of The Utrecht Graduate School of Art and Design Henk Slager. The issue of this edition sounds like Farewell to Research. Could the novel forms of exploration replace the habitual concept of an academized research? Some performative events, living labs, screenings, curatorial workshops as well as the keynote projects will clarify the perspectives of the artistic field for the nearest future.

Rainbow benches all over London by British artist Paul Insect

No, it’s not an LGBT community promotion, but an homage to healthcare workers who are having it tough during the ongoing pandemic. Renowned British artist Paul Insect collaborated with Block London Furniture to create a series of colourful benches that now can be found in different parts of London. The artist says, it’s a perfect time to explore the city — so clean and empty has the UK capital been never before, still it’s important to keep social distance.

P.S. According to the latest news, the police was trying to remove some of the benches from the public places. Hopefully, a few will remain. You can follow the situation via Paul Insect’s Instagram.

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The Future smell: one question to make you change

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A l e x a n d r a  K h a r k o v s k a y a

The Future smell: one question to make you change

Have you ever smelled yourself? If not, do it now. For sure, in a few days you will forget your current „body smell“ and today’s air will become yesterday’s memory. Sadly, but in a world with the potential for interplanetary flights, people haven`t learned to capture smells as well as photos. Permanently. We does mean smell, not perfume. 

Smells like tree spirit

Would you like to remember what your mother’s hair smelled like the day you were born? Or the smell of the first kiss, the first lipstick, the smell of Christmas? Now you should get goosebumps, but if not, we suggest you look at the project Studio Omer Polak (Israel). The creators of the installation at the SENSE ME exhibition asked a more global question, what will near-total deforestation would entail? Will scientists recreate the «forest in a test tube» to allow future generations to feel how their ancestors lived? The artificial jungle consists of 15 Manau rattan cane poles, each one of them stores the individual scent component of various organic materials collected in the forest.

Together with perfumer, Marc Vom Ende from Symrise, the creative team gathered eight different fragrances: mushroom, Linden, tree resin, moss, damp soil, a sweat of a forest’s mammal, broken wood and young fresh green leaves. It is terrible to imagine that in a few hundred years our descendants will be lining up for a bottle of sweat of forest inhabitants.

Along with the smells, small speakers are placed along the rattan tubes that play the sounds of a moth flapping his wings, a mosquito flying around etc. This creates an immersive effect. In this case, you become a participant in the installation, and not just a passer-by.

Date: until June 1, 2020
Venue: at Trapholt Museum, Denmark

an Eau de Covid-19

“Smells do not need passports,” a smell-communication specialist Sissel Tolaas shares her thoughts, “as well as viruses.” Perhaps it was this statement that prompted Sissel to create an antiseptic soap weighing 10 kg, using the body’s own bacteria and smells.

However, we don’t need to know what Covid-19 smells like, so we’d better stay 2 meters away from it, okay? While the company mentioned above — the German Symrise Lab — will give a dose of optimism to those who fighting under the shadow of the coronavirus by now. Nineteen Symrise fragrance perfumers from around the globe added sustainable ingredients one by one to create the HERO, a unisex Eau de Cologne. The Symrise Group will donate this to front-line corona heroes in the US, France, China, Singapore, Brazil and Dubai beginning May 19, 2020.

Head notes: Madagascan mandarin, Bergamot, Peppermint, Ginger
Heart notes: Ambrette seeds, Orris, Rose
Base notes: Guaiac wood, Sandalwood, Madagascan vetiver, Cypress, Vanillin, Ambrostar

Keep in mind the smells you love
OXOXO, PURPLEHAZE

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Tutorial on how to create contemporary art

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L i s a  L u k y a n o v a

Tutorial on how to create contemporary art

Nothing you can’t turn into art. Artists were proving it over and over again, without seeing the end of their experiments. In our article “BEING ON LOCKDOWN. How to find inspiration in everyday objects?” were shown the examples of implementing simple and unremarkable things into a piece of art. 

Today we are ready to inspire you again and present a little tutorial on how to create a contemporary art. This is a process of combining the mental, physical and essentially emotional effort of creating something that brings artists together over time and across media.

What Is It Made Of?

It could be anything!

Sheila Hicks, Pillar of Inquiry/Supple Column, 2013–14

Hicks has long been concerned with the intricacies of interfacing design of fibre objects with the environment that contains them, in this case in a museum building.

For Hicks, color, form, and texture are inextricably linked. She wants her work to ignite our urge to touch.  “I think that is important, the wanting: the desire to hold it in your hands, to befriend it, to see if it bites, or if it’s compatible to your existence, and in what way,” she said.

Color, shape and grain are intrinsically linked for Hicks. She wishes her artwork to ignite our desire to touch.

Liz Deschenes on Tilt/Swing (360º field of vision, version 1), 2009

Deshene’s work broadens photographic ideas by exploring the links between the mechanics of vision, image creation processes and modes of display.

The idea of her work is to make the viewer to look everywhere not only straight ahead as they usually observe masterpieces in the gallery. “The viewer takes on what would be the movements of the view camera, and the goal is to liberate the viewer so the viewer can make decisions about how they navigate the piece.”

Kerry Tribe, H.M., 2009

Tribe provides physical mechanisms of image movement in the content of its works. H.M. is a reconstructed portrait of Henry Molison, known in scientific literature as Patient H.M., who’s had a bad memory loss since his lobotomy. As with memory, the tape is unstable and decomposes over time.

How Is It Made?

Just be inspired!

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, The Myriad Motives of Men, 2014

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye paints rapidly, normally finishing his canvases in a single day.  She brings them back from her memories and remarks, and draws her inspiration from art history, by developing her thoughts in books, pictures and, in the final, on the canvas itself.

She doesn’t say much about who and where these figures are, preferring to keep her compositions open to any plot that the audience may bring to them.

Luther Price, Sorry, 2005–12

Luther Price once described the value of process: “It’s not always about what you are working on…..but how it gets there.” It took him seven years and 80 handmade slides to get to his collage-film, Sorry. Like large portions of his work—encompassing performance, films, and slides—Sorry includes scenes of suburban family life melded, in this case, with a 1940s film about Jesus and the Crucifixion.

Who Makes It?

Everyone.

Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker, Work/Travail/Arbeid, 2017

Work/Travail/Arbeid features seven dancers and seven musicians performing continuously during museum hours, which coincide, as De Keersmaeker has noted, with her company’s regular workday. The dancers twirl, run, skip, sway, guided by chalk patterns they have drawn on the floor (which they must redraw every hour) and by the unrestricted circulation of museumgoers.

Revital Cohen & Tuur Van Balen on 75 Watt, 2013

In 2013, the artists Revital Cohen and Tuur Van Balen traveled to Zhongshan, China to create an artwork at the White Horse Electric Factory. There, they made a film in which workers at an assembly line perform choreographed movements while assembling an enigmatic object.

Contemporary Art is a freedom!

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A new solo exhibition by Victoria Rosenman “Don’t kill me” opens August 20 Th at Haze Gallery

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A new solo exhibition by Victoria Rosenman “Don’t kill me” opens August 20 Th at Haze Gallery

The artist explores the space of an inner dialogue seeking connections between her present self and the child she used to be. Continuing her famous series “Vom Vernichten einer Muse” (Destruction of A Muse), Victoria Rosenman exposes the very condition of “deliberate uncertainty” that comes naturally to being a muse, releasing creative energy from it.

12 photo-based works by Victoria Rosenman will be on display until September 06/2020

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Martin Schoeller: Exhibition from June 20 at CAMERA WORK gallery

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Martin Schoeller: Exhibition from June 20 at CAMERA WORK gallery

CAMERA WORK gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of Martin Schoeller’s work from June 20 through August 29, 2020. The exhibition presents a selection of new portraits from Martin Schoeller’s legendary »Close Up« series for the first time worldwide. The selection includes famous international personalities such as Metallica, Michael Douglas, Toni Garrn, Anne Hathaway, Kobe Bryant, George Clooney, and Michael Jordan in a unique and incomparable visual language. A comprehensive photobook entitled »Works« was published by Steidl this year.

Martin Schoeller levels people from various backgrounds on the same platform, inviting comparison in a democratizing approach to portraiture that depicts famous subjects such as Robert  De  Niro  or Christopher Walken with the  same technical  treatment.  Schoeller started his »Close Up« series over 22 years ago. The exhibition showcases works created since 2005, when CAMERA WORK hosted his first »Close Up« exhibition. In this series the German artist photographs each of his subjects‘ faces with the same camera angle, lens, and lighting. The expressions are consistently neutral, serious yet relaxed, in an attempt to tease out people’s differences and capture moments »that feel intimate, unposed.« Just like in a trusting relationship, the portrayed individuals accept the photographer’s rules, which have lent to his unique style that became a trademark around the world. These rules, for example, include the minimal utilization of make-up as well as doing without beauty or skin touch-up in post-production. The result is a more vulnerable, mask-less form of expression, enabling an easier study of faces and personalities.

Martin Schoeller

Born in Munich in 1968, Martin Schoeller is one of the most renowned and preeminent contemporary portrait photographers. After studying photography in Berlin at the prestigious Lette-Verein and in Hamburg, he assisted as Annie Leibovitz in New York for four years before starting to focus exclusively on his own photography in 1996. Martin Schoeller is a regular contributor to acclaimed publications and, like Richard Avedon before him, served as a contract editorial photographer for »The New Yorker«. His first book »Close Up« (teNeues) was published in 2005, followed by several fine art books that showcase other facets of Schoeller’s work. Editions of his photography are sought-after in the fine art market and are exhibited in museums and art institutions around the world. The Nederlands Fotomuseum in Rotterdam hosted a retrospective in 2018 and NRW-Forum in Düsseldorf is presenting a retrospective until September 2020.

Exhibition from June 20 through August 29, 2020 Telephone interviews with Martin Schoeller on request

CAMERA WORK · Kantstrasse 149 · 10623 Berlin · Germany www.camerawork.de Opening hours: Tuesday to Saturday · 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. · Free admission

 @cameraworkgallery   @cameraworkberlin · #cameraworkgallery

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The rise of Eastern European brands: new players upping the game

By /BLOG/, /FASHION/

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A l i n a  S t e b l o v s k a y a

The rise of Eastern European brands: new players upping the game

When we think of fashion and the main fashion capitals, Eastern Europe does not immediately come to mind. This is not a surprise too: historically, we have praised French and Italian couturiers, often neglecting everyone else. However, the times are changing, the map of fashion is expanding with places like Eastern Europe becoming one of the new fashion hubs.

Even though the oldest brands have maintained their timeless status, new players join the game, and they have a lot more to prove. In order to claim their place on the fashion scene, they need to be more creative and innovative than some of the “old boys”. And this makes them even more interesting to watch.

Nehera 

This Slovak brand have been the talk of the town for the last few years. Originally founded back in1930s by a Czechoslovakian entrepreneur, Jan Nehera, who opened more than 130 stores across the globe before the World War II jeopardised everything. The fashion brand was reinvented in 2014/ 2015 with the help of French designer and stylist Samuel Drira. Since then, Nehera keeps intriguing with its clean yet intricate silhouettes, oversized fit and prevalence of neutral tones, even after Drira and Nehera parted ways.

Nehera 

Nehera 

Nehera 

Nanushka

On the crossroads between sustainability and creativity, this Hungarian brand has become known for its vegan leather staples. Founded back in 2006 by Sandra Sandor, it was not really known to many up until 2016 when it has become “insta-famous”. In 2020, with its modern twist on bohemian style and strong stance on eco-conscious matters, we can say that it is there to stay.

Nanushka

Nanushka

Nanushka

Bevza 

It is not often that we see Ukrainian brands on the podiums alongside with the bigger names. However, in case of Bevza, this is a very different story. Established in 2006 by Svitlana Bevza, it has been exploring modern interpretations of the timeless classics. Its minimal yet highly creative and intricate designs did not leave the chance for the brand to go unnoticed in the fashion community.

Bevza

Bevza

Bevza

Daily Sleeper 

Another Ukrainian brand, founded by two fashion editors Kate Zubarieva and Aysa Varetsa, that put the Zeitgeist at its core. Before the pandemic broke out and the need in comfortable, yet stylish loungewear be worn to stay in and go out, became evident, Daily Sleeper has conquered the hearts of the global fashion community. Worn by influencers and celebrities, from Leandra Medine to Dakota Fanning, it might not be on the podiums, but will definitely occupy a permanent spot in many closets.

Daily Sleeper 

Daily Sleeper 

Daily Sleeper 

Lesyanebo

Founded in 2015 by a Russian designer Olesya Shipovskaya without the help of investors, the brand featured a very minimal collection of oversized power suits for women. Things have changed since them, and now Lesyanebo, worn by many fashionistas, has expanded its clothing line while honouring the cultural heritage of its motherland, getting inspired by Russian poetry, novels and fairytales.

Lesyanebo

Lesyanebo

Lesyanebo

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Hoist the Colors! Bright Accents in Make-Up

By /BEAUTY/, /BLOG/

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A l e x a n d r a  A z a r o v a

Hoist the Colors! Bright Accents in Make-Up

‘Summer I’m in love’ – the Cure could have sung this song differently had not Friday got in the way. Let’s restore justice and express our warmest welcome to dear summer which will be here just in several days. And – hoist the colors in honor of the arrival of the most inspiring season by adding some bright accents to our everyday look. Where, when and how, along with some tips to be a real showstopper – here is our best advice.

Modesty first

To be bright prepare to be modest! One accent at a time is the most important rule of dealing with bright colors when applied to everyday make-up. Set apart a show or a fantasy make-up we won’t want to walk around wearing all the colors of the rainbow. Your best pick will be one accent of one bright color in a generally neutral look. A natural make-up in nudes or pastels will set off a bold color and at the same time be a canvas for your creativity.

Where to apply – lips…

Best advice is to follow the nature (it works for nearly everything, right?). What are the most expressive features of our face? Eyes and lips – so let’s attract more attention to them! All sort of vibrant reds, noble violets, velvet browns and deep oranges win the game for juicy seductive lips which are just impossible to look away from. Remember to keep your eyes natural in this case – light contouring with an eye pencil, a stroke of neutral eyeshadow and mascara will be just enough.

Tip: be sure to outline your lips precisely with a well sharpened lip pencil as the contour should be really neat. Colorless anti-feathering lip pencils (e. g. by Make Up For Ever of MAC) do a great job in keeping your vibrant lips in place all day long.

… and eyes

If you feel like playing with color – your eyes suit it best. Though applying bright eyeshadows in day make-up in most cases will look blatant, we won’t say ‘no’ to a clever dash of eyeliner of some vivid color.

To win the game dealing with bright accents, don’t forget the general rules of complimentary colors. Yellow and orange tints are the best choice for blue eyes; brown ones will appear most attractive when highlighted with various blues, while the beauty of green eyes will flourish against pinks, violets and lilacs.

Tip: if you haven’t got a color eyeliner there is no need to rush to the nearest make-up store. Wet your eyeliner brush and pass upon the eyeshadow cake. You may want to repeat it several times to grab enough color. Be sure to try the color on your palm first.

And the main rule is… keep experimenting and welcome the summer!

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