Monthly Archives

Mai 2022

Open Call for photography

By /NEWS/
Open Call for photography

The 2022 year will stay in our memory as a cruel and bloody year, a year of civil and human tragedy. Now, when the whole world is in agony when people are dying, and losing their homes, and families we all can’t stay aside. As we know, artists are very sensitive people and we want to take a chance for them to say what they are thinking about, and what they are feeling, no matter what.
Since today HAZEGALLERY resumes representation of photographers and visual artists from Ukraine, Russia, and CIS countries. We came to this decision because we are sure that the art is the multicultural language of the piece and we want to tell it to everyone. We know many talented photographers and artists, who have to be silent in their countries because of politics.
Every month our gallery will show an exhibition (a week or two) by one contemporary painter or photographer for CIS countries. Then we will work as a showroom and our visitors will have the possibility to see all our authors.
We hope this position will help our viewers to understand how many brilliant and unique authors live in Ukraine, Russia, and over CIS countries, to understand their pacific and strong position, even if they are keeping silent because of the circumstances.

Purplehaze Magazine news

By /NEWS/
Purplehaze Magazine news

From the very opening, Purplehaze magazine was a space of freedom, where artists, photographers, and curators have opportunities for self-expression. All these years our team has been trying to not intervene in the author’s projects and texts. Because the first of our rules is to be impartial. Before today, we were focused on art and fashion, but now we want to a little bit correct our main themes and we will start work primarily with contemporary art and photography.
Also, we will change the frequency of issuance of print magazines. The next issue will be printed in December 2022 and from now it will be the almanac of the best projects and texts of the year. It will have two parts: contemporary art and photography. We choose this various because we want to make a review of the year, and summarise the changes in art life, society, and the global.
In 2022, being tolerant of people, and foreign cultures became a really difficult task because we all can’t think about politics, society, ecology, and other global problems. We are sure that art is the way to improve our society, to make us better: clever, softer, more tolerant. And we want to allow painters, photographers, and writers from the whole world to be heard and involved in the global art society.

„TRANSFORMATION“ Solo Exhibition by LASHA TCHRELASHVILI

By /ART/, /NEWS/
"TRANSFORMATION" Solo Exhibition by LASHA TCHRELASHVILI

ARTIST: LASHA TCHRELASHVILI
CURATED BY: IRINA RUSINOVICH
LOCATION: Bulowstrasse 11, 10789, Berlin
EXHIBITION DURATION: 02.06.2022 – 18.06.2022
VERNISSAGE: 02.06.2022 AT 7PM

Pictorial traditions in art have a very deep and long history. Since the Middle Ages and Renaissance artists have been trying to find their unique and individual way, form of utterance. Painters used color as a medium and expression method, escaping more and more new facets of interpretations. In the Symbolism tradition, artists used color as a code, where each color had its own meaning. And today many painters are working with color very carefully and attentively, using colors as sights and some sort of visual message.

In the TRANSFORMATION project Lasha Tchrelashvili is reflecting about the inner force that all of us have inside. Today, when the whole world is in a permanent crisis, we have many problems: social, political and ecological. Everyday we have to fight with circumstances and with ourselves, make moral choices day by day. We should be strong to stay human, to not go insane.   

Artist uses color as an image language, telling for viewers the story of his life through sharp abstract images. His artworks are abstractive and very expressive. When we look closely, we see that all forms on canvas look like they are in movement, like in second they will be in another place, in another world.

Visitors of the exhibition with autor go on a journey through the years, through the important events of the artist’s life. From canvas to canvas we see the history of Lasha’s maturity, the process of tempering his character. 

LASHA TCHRELASHVILI 

Painting process is a kind of a thinking process for me. Sometimes you get distracted, other times you’re fully invested. It’s a dynamic process both emotionally and conceptually. My paintings are products of this thinking process which I then observe. Through these observations I analyze my internal, spiritual state and my position in relation to the universe. My intention is not to contain the dialogue within my own world, therefore I open up the conversation with a question. I title my paintings as a question in order to spark the desire for exploration within the viewers themselves. 

The main accent of my paintings is a state of transcendence. In this state of liminality the relationship between familiar and unfamiliar takes you through a mysterious experience.

Ukrainian women in Photography

By /ART/, /NEWS/
Ukrainian women in Photography

Eva Dzhyshyashvili

I explore myself deeper and deeper to finally find myself on top of personal
perception, through reflection the image is manifested, the generalized female image of which I become a part. Private, individual, personal leads to the generalized. I concentrate on the parts, looking at the fragments of my body to crumble and relieve tension. Because it is not me anymore, on the surface a female image, so powerful and fragile. And I’m in the depths.

„Swan“ Symbolic revival by Anna Cherkas

This project presents autographic images. The author symbolizes himself with a white swan.
The goal of the project is openness and acceptance of your body. Reflection of the
symphony, with the help of the body and feminine natural beauty, in a symbolic image.

According to belief, the bird is equated with human qualities. They are a symbol of true sincere feelings, pure and mutual love. According to the sign, the swan is a bird of poets. A meeting with him is considered lucky.

HAIR by VICTORIA LIKHOLYOT

Ph: Victoria Likholyot
Models: Victoria Likholyot, Tatiana Afanasieva

Long hair in modern culture is a female secondary sex characteristic. I religion, traditional culture, mythology, many stories are associated wit women’s hair: from the traditions of covering the hair after the wedding to the Christian stories about Saint Agnes, who had her hair grown to cover he nakedness.

Victoria Likholyot is a photographer based in Kharkiv, Ukraine. She studied photography at the School of Contemporary Art and the Chekachkov Photo Academy, both in Kharkiv, Ukraine. Likholyot’s work has been exhibited at the Kharkiv Municipal Gallery, Kharkiv, Ukraine; Lavra Gallery, Kyiv, Ukraine; and the
Grand Palais, Paris, France. She is currently a lecturer of Feminist art at the Karazin National University in Kharkiv, Ukraine.

Julia Lazumirska

Karen Cavallaro „Beach party“

By /FASHION/, /NEWS/

BEACH PARTY

Photographer: Karen Cavallaro @cavallaroretouch
Model: Alina Balak @alinabalak
Fashion Designer: Vivien Sander @viviensandr

Pants: Lascana, Jacket: ASOS Design, Tights: saint sass

Pants: Lascana, Jacket: ASOS Design, Tights: saint sass; Bikini: River Island, Necklace: H&M, Coat: vintage

Dress: Vivien Sander

Dress: Vivien Sander, Shoes: Zara

Dress: Vivien Sander, Shoes and Jacket: Zara

Tatiana Bruleva „Fashion look“

By /FASHION/, /NEWS/

FASHION LOOK

Photographer: Tatiana Bruleva @tanya_bru
Model/Creative Director: Leona Bordonava @leo_bordonaba
Retoucher: Daria Lisovaya @lisovaya_retouch_
Assistant: Dmitry Smirnov @rodrgz.jr
Assistant: Vitaly Zabavin @vitalllka
Makeup Artist/Hair Stylist: Polina Ponomarenko @iampolchik

Top – vintage Tights – vintage Sunglasses – Asos design

Bodysuit – Intimissimi Shoes – @diorarim.ru Accessories – vu__art; Marfin Jewelry 

Bodysuit – Intimissimi Shoes – @diorarim.ru Accessories – vu__art; Marfin Jewelry 

Blazer – custom Bermuda shorts – Mango Belt – custom Accessories – vu__art Marfin Jewelry Gloves – custom Shoes – vintage Socks – vintage

Christina Yang „Red Noise“

By /ART/, /NEWS/

RED NOISE

Production: Christina Yang (@christ.ywn) & Ruka Zheng (@zwenjiejie)
Photographer: Christina Yang (@christ.ywn)
Styling: Ruka (@zwenjiejie)
HMUA: Wenzi 
HMUA Assistant: Yeye
Model: Rain 
Assistant: Shao & Kun

Wardrobe:
Fashion Design:
Aojierou (@aojierou) 
Yueqi Qi (@_yueqiqi) 
022397 Bluff

Accessories:
Sunwanw (@sunwanw) 
Mojo G 
#MX# 
MATHILDA
GEL啫喱

Interview with Female Artists from HAZEGALLERY

By /ART/, /INTERVIEW

Text: I r i n a  R u s i n o v i c h
All photos are provided by the authors of the HAZE Gallery

Interview with Female Artists from HAZEGALLERY

Interview with Marina WitteMann

What artwork/series of works do you find pivotal for your career? 

It was a series of colour fields made of paper that has become a turning point for my career as an artist. Prior to that, I analyzed every work of mine considering it to be a new step of development. Thus, my creative self evolved and infused with each of my artworks. However, even I was amazed by what happened at the very beginning of this series.

Ever since I can remember it, I have enjoyed a special relationship with colour. It’s called synesthesia: when sensations emanating from one sense organ are also manifested in another one, for example, seeing the pain in colour or feeling the shape of a cold. Therefore, my art revolved around this. Before, I didn’t understand why it happened. The desire to analyze, reproduce, compare the colour with form and material prompted me to do new experiments. 

I love oil paints for its texture and colour purity, but this has never been enough for me. I felt a need to go beyond the canvas, to feel the colour in the space. In sculpture, the shape interferes with the colour, that’s why I opted for it. The way I work now allows me to use paint and other materials as they are, leaving out the original colour and the history of these objects. That’s how I translate the emotions I experience daily through artistic materials.  

How has being a woman affected your career?

Surprisingly, I have always enjoyed being a woman, though perfectly realizing that women tend to think in a too complicated way and yield to emotions. All that prevents women from discarding the unnecessary and focusing on what is really important. I cultivated those qualities myself, so now I can control my emotions, while still enjoying my feminine essence. I seek to express the tenderness and softness of female nature in the floral and gentle shape of my art objects. The paper structure catches the eye and lets one penetrate the surface at the same time, just like the woman nature implies.

What makes a great artist?

It seems to me that an artist becomes great when their art begins to resonate in the souls and the minds of other people. It’s just the way it works in all spheres of life. A great artist is capable of creating a piece that is equally simple and complex. For example, imagine a work where a composition reveals through the material, while the material, in turn, establishes many associations the viewer might recognize. The colour grabs attention and starts a discussion; the texture excites and awakens a desire to touch the piece, to communicate with it physically… From the work, the viewer gains a longstanding experience and a sense of time. Therefore, a great artwork is inevitably modern, as it reveals the timeless conditions of being alive. 

Which other great women artists inspire you and why?

This list is endless. And by the way, I don’t divide artists into men and women. Primarily, I look at the object or the non-material result of work and only then, will I read the author’s story. I can still highlight a few of my favourite female artists and just women with a capital letter W. A great woman who inspires me is not just a woman who paints with oil or makes sculptures. For me, it’s a creative being full of willpower, authenticity, and capacity to communicate with people and life. 

Here I would like to mention Matrona Moskovskaya as one of my sources of inspiration. Saint Matrona was blind and lost the ability to walk early in life. With all the hardships, she was so strong in spirit that she kept working wonders for people. So those miracles for me are what artists should strive for in their artistic practice. In general, being an artist and a saint at the same time, like Andrei Rublev, for example, seems to me an especially fruitful combination (and history proves it). 

Another Russian artist who inspires me is the ballerina Maya Plisetskaya. Her energy, passion, hard work, strong character, elegance and progressive thinking are what I am guided by in my work. 

Choreographer Sharon Eyal is no less inspiring for me. When I first saw her Untitled black performance in Shanghai, it felt like a shock and an extravaganza. I was struck by the incredible naturalness of the movements the troupe did on stage. Music, costumes — everything looked as if it were taken from the future. It seems to me a real work of art should be just like that: progressive, challenging, highly material, and sensual.

In general, I tend to consider my contemporaries while searching for inspiration. For example, artist Phyllida Barlow is like a teacher to me now. If I have a question, I will certainly look for an answer in Barlow’s works. I love the simplicity of her materials and the way they’re interpreted. The completed work should be viewed not with the eyes, but with the soul. To be able to ‘read’ art objects that have been created on a sensory level, one needs to use their sixth sense. I feel a strong connection with Russian culture here: I guess we, Russians, often communicate this way. 

Last but not the least, I should mention artist Marina Abramovic. I will never stop learning from her. The way she communicates with the viewer and reaches catharsis, the mediums she uses in art, all that captivates my attention. For me, it’s about feelings, soul, experience, and in general the development of the sixth sense.

What advice would you give to emerging female artists entering the art world?

— Take yourself seriously and enjoy the process. If you don’t believe in yourself, then no one will, why should they? In art, you can lie, neither to yourself nor to the viewer; if someone senses a catch, the work won’t be recognized as a true art. At the same time, if you don’t experience pleasure from doing art, you will hardly be able to engage others with your ideas.

— Listen to yourself and constantly work, then everything falls into place.

— Always try new things. And reflect on it.

— Compare yourself with contemporaries and geniuses and draw conclusions: has your work differed; if so, for better or worse etc. 

— Continue to doubt, otherwise you may either remain ignorant or stop your search too early.

Interview with Elena Fuks (Lentov)

What artwork/series of works do you find pivotal for your career? 

I wouldn’t call it pivotal, however, my decision to enter the sphere of art was related to this particular piece. It was the first artwork I sold: a watercolor on an A5 sheet of paper portraying a little girl in the style of Yoshitomo Nara. One day, I was invited to participate in the big student fair of contemporary art at the British Higher School of Art and Design. Among the participants, I was the only non-student; full of hesitation, I was in the process of choosing my future career at the time. Nevertheless, I had all of my artworks sold by the end of the fair.

How has being a woman affected your career?

I find it really difficult to answer this question without having an experience of being a male artist. I can’t say for sure, but female art seems more emotional and sincere to me. 

What makes a great artist?

A great mind and an unquenchable inspiration.

Which other great women artists inspire you and why?

To be honest, I don’t have idols and normally I don’t pay attention to the gender of the artist either. I’m rather inspired by the art piece itself and the emotions it conveys. For me, the pure source of inspiration is hidden in daily life, in the stories and personalities of ordinary people… So you can be the first to transfer these feelings into the realm of art. 

What advice would you give to emerging female artists?

Be yourself, don’t dread the ‘journey’ with all its ups and downs, and always remember about your goals.

Interview with Kristina Okan 

What artwork/series of works do you find pivotal for your career? 

I would say it is my Allusions graphic series. What I did in the period of 2017—2018 defined my entire artistic practice so far. I feel like I have found my voice. Besides, I have realized that the process itself is just as important as the outcome in art. 

How has being a woman affected your career?

Luckily, my gender has never affected my career in neither way. I believe there should always be enough space for both male and female artists on the art scene.

What makes a great artist?

Honesty with yourself. Sensitive interaction with the world. Regular doubting and questioning what you do.

Which other great women artists inspire you and why?

Alicja Kwade is an absolutely mind-blowing artist for me. The way she works with materials such as stone and wood is great and simple and smart and impressive at the same time, it looks like pure magic! Giovanna Garzoni has become my recent discovery: her works are very inspiring because of their mesmerizing quality and a very sensitive admiration of nature they transmit. I also think here of Yayoi Kusama, her parallel universe where you just lose a sense of reality.

What advice would you give to emerging female artists?

Be in contact with your inner voice, never let it down. Always be the best version of yourself.