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Februar 2021

Wind of change: NYFW transforms but remains

By /BLOG/, /FASHION/, /NEWS/
Text

Julia Kryshevich

Wind of change: NYFW transforms but remains

Preface

If you identify yourself as a fashion enthusiast and try staying on top of it, you might have mainly spent last week in front of your laptop screen, watching the digital manifestation of New York Fashion Week. Well, so did we. Having slowly started off on February 13 (all eyes were on Ulla Johnson’s boho collection that day), the event lasted until February 18, at least, its major part. Only a limited number of guests were allowed to physically attend the shows, while the rest had to make do with online broadcasts, which, by the way, didn’t seem to be a big concession.
June 18 – 21, 2020
Rhypark, Basel / Switzerland
www.rhy-art.com

In fact, not everyone demonstrated the full-fledged shows — besides,  there were a great number of teasers or rather brief presentations, but that said, which were worked out creatively. For instance, Imitation of Christ dedicated their video piece ‘to all the people who have lost a loved one this year’ (most notably, it was broadcasted on Saint Valentine’s Day), Private Policy and No Sesso ‘adapted’ their shows to an Instagram video format, putting a smile on the viewers’ faces, while Rodarte just called their friends and colleagues to recall the previous 15 years of fashion for almost 15 minutes. Meanwhile the ‘going digital’ format has recently been tested by many designers (just think of Milan and Mercedes-Benz Russia fashion weeks, which took place in autumn 2020), there were still some significant and rather unusual changes at the recent NYFW.

It goes without saying, the pandemic has hit hard: the non-basic services and goods were directly affected, and the fashion industry was no exception. Most likely for that reason some eminent couturiers were either absent this NYFW season or have transferred their presentations to different locations/rescheduled them. And it showed: on the one hand, we saw many regulars missing like Ralph Lauren, Marc Jacobs, Michael Kors, and Calvin Klein; on the other hand, it was offset by the new blood, who weren’t necessarily based in New York or, right, even in America. That was a good excuse to invite some foreign designers to take part in the show, among which were Concept Korea, INF, Asia Fashion Collection (uniting designers from South Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong), and Studio 189, the NY-Ghanaian label focusing on promoting African designers.

All those alterations gave birth to the idea of the American Collection’s Calendar, which would embrace schedule of shows by American designers, not only during the week from February 13—18, but also some upcoming ones like those by Christian Siriano and Oscar de la Renta (early March) and Jonathan Cohen (mid April). It’s important to note that US designers showcasing their collections in London, Paris, and other places will as well be included in the Calendar.

On the cover: Backstage shooting on Jason Wu fashion show. Photo: Hunter Abrams

 

Part 1

NYFW: Panoramic view

Singling out trends at fashion weeks has always been a tricky task: every designer has their own vision, thus, perceived similarities in the collections often turn out to vary in style and tone and have rather different meanings. Things are getting even more complicated at the latest New York Fashion Week, where the far-reaching Fall Winter 2021-2022 collections are mixed with more topically relevant Spring-Summer campaigns. A whirlwind combination of light clothing and warm outfits, sensible casual and extravagant glamour can take one aback but won’t leave indifferent, for sure.

This NY season couturiers have paid special attention to the shoulder area, shielding it with the most beautiful shapes of cover, such as puff, leg o’mutton, and Juliet sleeves. As for the body, there is a backward tendency to expose it — disclosed bellies, triangle cutouts and backless dresses couldn’t have remained unnoticed. By golly, the 2021 NYFW season may be described as a battle between chastity and provocation: meanwhile some designers hit sequins and disco shades hard, others opted for turtleneck mid length dresses and elongated basic shirts. No accounting for taste, more so if it’s the couturier’s one, yet here is what we get, trying to summarize the impressions of the season (for those loving to go into detail, some close-ups are coming in the next part).

Bohemian Summer

‘Summertime will be a love-in there’ 

Designers who decided to go for this trend might want to play on our lack of Vitamin D and light-hearted spirit in the end of winter. By the way, that doesn’t necessarily concern themselves. Los Angeles-based brand Maisie Wilen (with Kanye West’s protégé, fashion designer Maisie Schloss standing behind it) seems to be just radiating the Californian sun-kissed, laid-back mood, mixing it up with an ounce of psychedelics. Yes, skintight jumpsuits and leggings are back, so get ready to walk on water, just like the models in the Maisie Wilen latest fashion show did.

Another LA label Stan launched by the artist and surfer Tristan Detwiler suggests wearing hand-tailored jackets, homey cosy and a bit pretentious at once. Rebecca Minkoff opts for matching a face mask to your boho dress, along with multilayer jewelry, fringe, and exquisite sandals. If you come from a relatively cool European climate, where summer season sometimes feels like autumn, better listen to a model Parisian, brand Maison Kitsuné. Their SS 2021 collection demonstrates interseasonal urban items like transparent raincoats, Panama hats tied-up with neckerchiefs, and striped shirts. All in all, boho is primarily about light sweet shades, loose garments, and simple, rhythmical patterns, which the above mentioned couturiers gracefully prove. 

Hardcore Couture

‘Diamonds are a girl’s best friends’ 

While dealing with hard luxury, there is a high risk of overdoing, yet eminent masters of evening looks trust their taste and expertise too much to question that. Can’t get enough of glamour, polish, and languorous shades? Join the club of the privileged. Among the special members are such couturiers as Tadashi Shoji (Japan/LA) and Bibhu Mohapatra (India/NY) whose mindblowing evening gowns one just can’t help staring at. Both designers refer to Baroque in their latest collections, embellishing clothing with rich embroidery and lacework, using silk and satin and, yes, color black, with the difference that, Tadashi Shoji also alludes to Gothic (just look at his long gloves, jackboots, intricate floral elements, and sharp chokers).

Bronx and Banco hits even harder, demonstrating sequins-covered leg warmers, dresses with convertible straps (and all kinds of cutouts, by the way), and splendid flounces. As for their choice of color, probably, it’s the blackest collection presented this season at NYFW. If you aren’t ready for such a blackout slightly squared with shiny rhinestones, take a look at Badgley Mischka Fall 2021 collection. Noble shades of silver, gold, and deep blue, fur coats, and front bow corsets will make you feel a welcome guest at any luxurious event.

For those wanting to play hard, The Blonds have created a very nightlife-inspired line with items glittering like a mirror ball. Conversely, looking for something businesslike yet fancy? Then you might like the magenta power suit by Marcell von Berlin in three possible hues to choose from.

New Age Unisex 

‘If I were a boy, even just for a day’

Fashion for unisex doesn’t sound like hot news anymore: actually, androgynous looks came back in the aughts after the hypersexual decade of the 1990s was over. To dig a little deeper, there were a couple of turning points in history that shaped that phenomenon in vogue, like the first and the second waves of sexual revolution, in the 1920s and 1960s respectively. Feels like one can’t figure out anything fresh in the field, but it’s very viable, some of the NYFW participants claim and prove that in action.

Menswear designer Victor Li sticks with street casual classics like loose coats, denim suits, and bombers, making them sound more authentic. For instance, he bleaches the suit and puts ethic patterns on lapels and cuffs or graces the business jacket with marvelous prints like those depicting a ranch or a fragment of the letter writing. A considerable part of the outfits might be worn both by men and women, Victor Li’s presentation demonstrates.

Italian designer Federico Cina takes an even more radical stance showcasing his collection simultaneously on female and male models (the video screen is split in half). Danish couturier Christian Juul Nielson, who stands behind the brand Aknvas and also known as the Creative Director of Herve Leger couldn’t help to devote his latest Fall Winter 2021 collection to both sexes to show how perfect plaid coats, textured sweaters, and knitted sweatshirts look on any of the genders. Special focus on the color palette: blood red and ice blue are genderless colors, like any others, yet through them one can express their identity and spirit.

So Casual, So Business-like

‘Six inch heels, she walked in the club like nobody’s business’

One’s modus vivendi affects their style of dress, that’s inevitable. We, inhabitants of concrete jungles, less and less keep our working and private lives separate (eating out with colleagues, finishing some urgent work at the home office), ending up mixing casual and business elements in our looks. Well, taking advice from experts will make this task a way easier. New-York based brand Loring suggests wearing shirts over dresses and spicing up the world-old ‘black-n-white’ duo with various configurations of the two colors like those of a chessboard, diagonal stripes, and the color-blocking principle.

The Ukrainian label Theo proves the fashion for mid length women’s dresses of modest shades, which might be wrapped up with a pocketed transforming puffy jacket (who cares that it was designed for men) or a unisex winter coat with lapels and thin straps. The Japanese brand KoH T knows how to make a business suit look a bit more laidback without wasting its solidity. Perhaps all you have to do in this case is not tuck your shirt in so that your snow-white puffs could show through the black sleeves of the suit jacket.

Proenza Schouler shares their version of a perfect business casual look: a neat patch placed where the cutout of the dress/pants is, a bit of the exposed skin (not much, but enough), bat sleeves, fringe, sparse buttons, and, good heavens, sandals made of the monolith, flexible material à la bendy pencils. A string of rather unusual solutions, isn’t it? Still if you feel like you lack avant-garde, Chocheng Fall 2021 collection might be a match for you. Headgears reminding of the Japanese national kasa distinctly allude to respect for traditions and fascination with cultural heritage, while vibrant shades of purple, orange, and red grinning through the basic black gives out a creative type. Among the hooks are jewellery in the form of Chinese paper lanterns, moccasins with ties (it’s possible!) put over the pant legs, and pocket flaps, likely with no pockets inside. 

The Odder, The Better

‘We are all mad here’ 

Today the circus and asylum are not the only places, which might accept eccentricity — we are meant to be different every day, not to say every couple of hours. Meanwhile, a great deal of those socially encouraged roles is often mutually exclusive. A way out? Valiantly trying to meet all expectations or rather creating one’s own universe, expressing oneself through the appearance. A handful of brands participating at the NYFW took the risk of looking ridiculous while presenting their latest collections, yet at stake was the opp to hit the jackpot — stand out of the crowd, outrage and just fascinate!

The aspiring London brand Ka Wa Key makes no secret about their plans to transform the accepted view of masculinity. Stretched out knitted sweatshirts, troubadour trousers, stripes of different widths — never before has menswear looked so poignant and emphatical. Libertine doesn’t lag behind, highlighting such outfits from their FW 2021 collection as jacket suits heavily splashed with patchworks (be it a starry sky, a page of a newspaper or an assemblage by the anonymous author) and every possible model of hats: e.g. like those of a witch, a pirate captain, a Panama hat and sombreros.

Actually, the latest collection by Anna Sui could have been put in the Bohemian Summer category: inarticulate flower and ethnic patterns explicitly reveal the hippie aesthetics. However, that would be too easy: not for nothing, the brand introduces funny cow spots, mysterious stellar shapes, tweed jackets with thick-framed sunglasses and other psychedelic fads. You get it… But if not, look for our recent review of Anna Sui Fall Winter 2021 collection. By the way, one doesn’t have to dress like a freak from head to toe to add a bit of extravagance into the look. A dyed faux fur coat put over the baby-doll dress leads to a similar wah-effect, like in the presentation by Maison Atia.

To be continued very soon… 

On the cover: Backstage shooting on Gabriela Hearst fashion show. Photo: Hunter Abrams

Gosia Błasiak „all about her skin“

By /ART/

ALL ABOUT HER SKIN

Model Katalina Candezano Arango @katalina_candezano from Generation Models @generation.models
Photographed & Art Directed by Gosia Błasiak @m.blasiak
MUAH Varvara Dediukhina @varvarad
Both artist represented by Magenta Represents @magentareps
Retouch by Maryna Lasevich @amedehi_retouch
Assistant & backstage Inga Cara @ingacaraphoto
Special thanks to Nicholas Lapité @nlapite
Wardrobe Swimwear by allSisters @allsisters_official

Sveta Maximova „aurora borealis“

By /ART/

AURORA BOREALIS

Photographer and Art Director – Sveta Maximova @thesvetamaximova
Stylists – Gina Bryzgalova @ginabryzgalova, Yana Usanova @wheres.joanna
Producer – Artemy Chukrov @artemychukrov
Style Assistant – Alina Krutakova @krutakova_
Set Design – Sveta Maximova @thesvetamaximova
Make-Up and Hair – Aina Adamova @mua_ainora
Assistants – Alice Suleimanova @alice_suul, Alexandra Chizhova @chizzhik
Model – Roxolana Dambaeva @rrroxolana @newnowagency
Minerals – Minerals Shop @minerals_shop  www.minerals-shop.ru
Special thanks to Yana Nikolaeva @ynnklv

Blouse – Irina Khakhileva @takto_ya_zmeya; Top – Mihaeli Design @mihaelidesign; Accessories – Ampersand @ampersand.ring; Mineral Weather @mineralweather; Blouse – Irina Khakhileva @takto_ya_zmeya; Skirt and hat – Sasha Shutkina @sashashutkina; Shoes – Zara

Dress – Muus @muus.brand; Vest – Onoma @onoma.clth; Coat – O5O @o5o.moscow; Pants – Mihaeli Design @mihaelidesign; Earrings – Ampersand @ampersand.rings

Blouse – Irina Khakhileva @takto_ya_zmeya; Skirt and hat – Sasha Shutkina @sashashutkina; Shoes – Zara

Top – Sasha Shutkina @sashashutkina; Corset – Alisa Kuzembaeva @alisakuzembaeva; Pants – Mihaeli Design @mihaelidesign; Dress – Nina Veresova @nina_lii; Shoes – Zara; Accessories – Ampersand @ampersand.ring; Mineral Weather @mineralweather

Blouse – O5O @o5o.moscow; Dress – Onoma @onoma.clth; Earrings – Ampersand @ampersand.rings; Coat – O5O @o5o.moscow; Pants – Mihaeli Design @mihaelidesign; Earrings – Ampersand @ampersand.rings

Dress – Muus @muus.brand; Vest – Onoma @onoma.clth; Blouse – Irina Khakhileva @takto_ya_zmeya; Top – Mihaeli Design @mihaelidesign; Pants – Muus @muus.brand; Shoes – Zara

Pants – Mihaeli Design @mihaelidesign; Accessories – Ampersand @ampersand.ring

Liz Dungate „the butterfly effect“

By /FASHION/

THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT

Photo – Liz Dungate @lizdungate
Makeup + Hair – LucyAnne Bottham using MAC @lucyannebothammakeup
Style – Vincent Lee @vlstyling
Model – Kristy McQuade @kristymcquade
Model Agency – Anita Norris @anm_mgmt  Fusion Models NYC @fusionmodelsnyc

Dress + crinoline – Maggie Liu @mlsarchive

Coat + Dress – Maggie Liu @mlsarchive; Heels – Zara; Dress and crinoline – Maggie Liu @mlsarchive; Heels – Zara

Dress – Melinda Yang @myinn_z; Heels – Public Desire; Body veil + headress  – Melinda Yang @myinn_z; Heels – Public Desire

Dress + crinoline – Maggie Liu @mlsarchive

Dress – Melinda Yang @myinn_z; Heels – Public Desire

Dress – Jenny Lu  @jennyyy.lu; Slip dress – Zara; Glove – Coach; Heels – Public Desire; Coat + Dress – Maggie Liu @mlsarchive; Heels – Zara;

Robe + dress- Rosannie Zeng @roz_artistry; Heels – Zara; Body veil + headress  – Melinda Yang @myinn_z; Heels – Public Desire;

Nienke Wind „silver smoke“

By /FASHION/

SILVER SMOKE

Creative Director/Photographer: Nienke Wind @nienkemwind
Model: Grisha Alexandra Prevoo @knownmodelmanagement @grishaprevoo
Stylist/Wardrobe Stylist/Makeup Artist/Hair Stylist: Roos Verboom @roosverboom www.roosverboom.com

Forever U – Metallic layered mini dress in champagne; ASOS DESIGN maxi bevel satin dress with plunge back cut out

Weekday Tea satin midi dress in light beige; Earrings Vintage from stylist

Forever U – Metallic layered mini dress in champagne; ASOS DESIGN satin drape mini dress with open back

Weekday Tea satin midi dress in light beige; ASOS DESIGN oblique bat maxi dress in oyster; ASOS DESIGN Fascinator headband with eye catching mesh

ASOS DESIGN satin drape mini dress with open back; ASOS EDITION pearl batwing maxi dress in white

„BODY – POSITIVITY“ at HAZE GALLERY

By /NEWS/
"BODY – POSITIVITY" at HAZEGALLERY

On February 27, HAZEGALLERY Berlin will host the opening of the BODY – POSITIVITY international exhibition, which will be held as part of the PURPLEHAZE MAGAZINE anniversary 005 issue launch.

The exposition will include works by contemporary artists from Europe, made in different media: graphics, installation, video and photography. The initiator of the exhibition project, which will become a platform for dialogue between authors from different art schools and cultural spaces, was the independent art community.

Curator Iren Russo
Assistant Sasha Grigg

The BODY – POSITIVITY exhibition reveals the topic of finding one’s own identity through the collected and reworked experience. Whether it’s the personal experience of the author or the experience of an entire generation. An attempt to find the constituent elements within and outside of oneself. Go beyond the limits of your understanding by changing the point of perception in order to find a different entrance to the existing reality. Put together separate pieces and find integrity. Collecting artifacts of the surrounding reality into objects and compositions, artists grope the way to their mosaic individuality and reflect on the problem of self-determination through interaction with real space in this multi-layered information-chaotic world.

The exhibition will feature works created in different genres, which tell about the search by modern man for the moment of harmony of the inner world and the endless chaos of events outside of it.

Opening | February  27, 2021 at 18:00.
Free admission |  16+
Exhibition Dates | February 27, 2021 – March 13, 2021
Working hours | by appointment
Contacts | haze.gallery

Art Digest: February 15—21

By /ART/, /BLOG/, /NEWS/
Text

Julia Kryshevich

Art Digest: February 15—21

Whew, New York Fashion Week has just ended, taking place in the first part of the week. I mean, it was an exciting, at some point rather unexpected show, so now it’s time to process the impressions. While an extensive review of the event is about to come up, we can already discuss some of its striking moments: e.g. how Anna Sui designers referred to Jane Birkin’s character from the 1968 movie in the brand’s Fall Winter 2021 collection. However, the current episode is not only about the NYFW 2021, but also some other news from the battlefield of fashion, arts, and, suddenly, food packaging design! The latter topic is well-known to most of us beginning from childhood, thus, I just couldn’t pass by… So welcome aboard, we’re about to take off!

Big Mac ® packaging by Pearlfisher. Courtesy of Pearlfisher

‘Innate joy of the McDonald’s’ in a new packaging designed by Pearlfisher 

I’m sure everyone knows this feeling. You have a long drive in a car with your sweetheart or family members. Suddenly you see an inviting red sign with a yellow letter M on it on the back of the road… Hesitation fades away, McDonalds is always a good idea! When you drive up to a food pick up window, what would you choose? Most probably, a Big Mac®? Well, since you’re a fish lover, you might take a Fillet-O-Fish®, and cheese enthusiasts will opt for the Cheeseburger®. Regardless of the country, most of us are used to roughly the same design of the packaging of our favorite McDonalds snacks. Yet from now on, things are getting different. 

Fast food chain McDonalds has briefed the branding agency Pearlfisher to create a new design for its food packaging. The main goal for the designers was to reflect McDonald’s‘ ‘playful point-of-view’ and its ‘innate joy’, Hamish Campbell, executive creative director at Pearlfisher shares. Graphics unveiled by the branding agency feature simple, recognizable, and facetious packaging items, each of them speaking for itself: e.g. the white wrapper of the EggMcMuffin® has a yellow ‘yolk’ on it, while the Quarter Pounder® box is covered with the stripes of ‘grilled cheese’ and ‘beef’. However, it’s the conical red packaging of the McDonalds French Fries® that undergoes no changes (perhaps they couldn’t think of anything better yet). To sum things up, the new McDonalds packaging design by Pearlfisher bribes with its witty simplicity, but shall it fully replace the existing and already fancied one? Well, time will show. 

New packaging design for McDonalds by Pearlfisher. Courtesy of Pearlfisher

In a Barbie world: designer Richard Quinn takes a doll to showcase his new collection 

Aged 31, London-based fashion designer Richard Quinn has already gained favor of such famous fashionistas as Queen Elisabeth II and singer Lady Gaga. Actually, why wouldn’t he? Apart from having incorporated technical-design smarts into his outfits, along with his signature wallpaper prints, Quinn also cares about the message: for instance, in his latest collections the designer has touched upon the topic of Brexit chaos, sharing his bold and positive ‘I-want-it-to-be-London-centric’ outlook. This time, however, Richard Quinn demonstrates a kind of a more laid-back attitude, testing a look from his Fall 2021 collection… on a Barbie doll! The collection is human-sized, by the way. 

‘If we were able to show this season, Barbie would be our woman of choice to open the show,’ Mr. Quinn explains in a statement. Okay, the point taken: since couturiers can’t come up with physical fashion shows yet, why not think about extraordinary ways of presenting new collections? A generously embellished gown based on a crinoline the Barbie mannequin wears was hand-crafted by Quinn’s atelier, #nooutsourcing. All in all, it took the tailors 10 days to complete the marvelous look. By the way, Richard Quinn x Barbie collaboration is a part of London Fashion Week unfolding these days. Check her official Instagram account, @barbiestyle to explore some other baby-doll looks. 

Richard Quinn Fall 2020 Ready-To-Wear collection. Photo_ Carlo Scarpato

A gown from Richard Quinn Fall 2021 collection, showcased on a Barbie doll. Courtesy of Richard Quinn_

Richard Quinn Fall 2020 Ready-To-Wear collection. Photo_ Carlo Scarpato

A bit of Jane Birkin in Anna Sui Fall Winter 2021 collection 

You remember that? Psychedelic looks in Anna Sui Fall Winter 2021 presentation broadcasted at the latest New York Fashion Week. Just in case you’ve missed it, there is a video below. But let me finish my thought. Couturier Anna Sui like no one knows that the devil is in the details, this rule perfectly works for the field of fashion, even if the collection items seem to be speaking for themselves.

That’s what we see in her Fall Winter 2021 campaign: titled ‘Phantasmadelic’, the collection features such boho outfits as faux-fur leopard coats, rhythmically-patterned tees and shirts, easy dresses embellished with ruching and sequins. The looks are topped with tender yet artistic makeup, inspired by the 1968 film ‘Wonderwall’. Performed by the incredible Jane Birkin, the main character, quite a typical swinging 60s fashion model is in the focus of her neighbor’s attention, who is a conventional scientist and has a nose for extraordinary, ‘beyond-one’s-self-control’ effects and their carriers. Yes, exactly, the movie is about the vibrant and psychedelic world of the artistic bohemia at that time, so you can imagine it’s rich visual aesthetics. Interesting enough, Jane Birkin’s character is called Penny Lane, just like the famous song by the Beatles, and what’s more, music for ‘Wonderwall’ was produced by George Harrison, the quartet’s lead guitarist. The carrying away sound, Jane’s chic cut-crease eye makeup and her dreamy outfits, that’s what makes the work a perfect source for inspiration. But you know, seeing is believing, so after getting enough of Anna Sui Fall Winter 2021 presentation, you might want to check out the film.

‘Neon Structure’ by Lucio Fontana to grace Guggenheim Bilbao’s atrium 

I bet the first work by Lucio Fontana that may come to your mind will be something from his Concetto Spaziale series or paintings with slots. It’s no wonder, while Fontana is widely known as the founder of Spatialism, an art movement, which proclaims synthesizing different mediums like color, sound, and space into a new type of an artistic expression. Concetto Spaziale is a really important part of the painter’s oeuvre, but not the only one. That’s what Guggenheim Bilbao might have thought about while arranging Fontana’s installation in the museum’s atrium, which, for its part, will be embellished by the artwork during the next three years. 

The light installation ‘Neon Structure’ by Lucio Fontana dates back to 1951, the year when the Ninth Milan Triennial themed Goods — Standards’ took place. Creating his work for the Triennial, the famous artist partially referred to the idea of light drawings introduced by his equally famous colleague Pablo Picasso a few years earlier, yet Fontana believed in the authenticity of his pet project. Meanwhile critics of the mid 20th century couldn’t fully appreciate the artist’s multifunctional concept, Lucio Fontana annoyingly noted in his statement: ‘[It] is not a lasso, an arabesque, nor a piece of spaghetti… it is the beginning of a new expression’. From now on, a wonderful piece of the luminous spaghetti (sorry, Lucio) will grace the atrium of Guggenheim Bilbao, just like it was at the Ninth Milan Triennial, at the Palazzo dell’Arte 70 years ago. 

Artist Pablo Picasso with his work ‘Light Drawing’ (1949). Photo_ Getty Images

Artist Lucio Fontana working upon his Spatial Concept painting. Photo_ Getty Images

‘Neon Structure’ by Lucio Fontana at the Palazzo del Arte, Milan (1951). Courtesy_ Photo Archive Fondazione La Triennale de Milano

On the cover: Jane Birkin in ‘Wonderwall’, 1968. Photo: Pinterest

Petros Kouiouris „calmy furiosity“

By /FASHION/

CALMY FURIOSITY

Stylist: Fany Polychroniou @fanipolychroniou
Model: Alexandra Van Zant @van.zant
Photographer: Petros Kouiouris @petros_koy
Makeup Artist: Anna Kurihara using MAC Cosmetics @annakuriharabeauty www.annakurihara.com
Hair Stylist: Risako Itamochi @risako_hair

Shirt. : Tri_ collective; Cape. : vintage; Pants. : Dawang; Shoes : Michael Kors; Necklace : F.P

Suit : Hirom Asai; Kimono : FP; Glasses : EENY eyewear; Necklace and earrings : FP; Shoes : Jeffrey Campbell; Top. : Zara; Skirt : BCBG; Earrings : Aria New York City; Pantyhose: Wolford; Shoes. : Geox

Pants. : Agua do Mar by Artemis; Corset : Lucille Reynolds; Jacket. : Zara; Shoes. : Jeffrey Campbell; Shirt. : Tri_ collective; Cape. : vintage; Pants. : Dawang; Shoes : Michael Kors; Necklace : F.P

Glasses. : EENY eyewear; Jacket. : Hot Mamma; Pants. :Urban outfitters; Shoes. : Jeffrey Campbell; Choker : F.P

Dresss.: Top shop; Shirt.: Balenciaga; Coat.: Mikage Shin; Hat : G-O-D-A; Bag. : Private policy; Panthyhose: Wolford; Earrings.: FP; Shoes.: Assos; Pants.: Agua do Mar by Artemis; Corset: Lucille Reynolds; Jacket. : Zara; Shoes. : Jeffrey Campbell

Top. : Zara; Skirt : BCBG; Earrings : Aria New York City; Pantyhose : Wolford; Shoes. : Geox