Monthly Archives

Mai 2020

Defining Fashion Zeitgeist 2020

By /BLOG/, /FASHION/

Text
A l i n a  S t e b l o v s k a y a

Defining Fashion Zeitgeist 2020

As any cultural phenomenon, fashion cannot exist on its own. It inevitably reflects the current trends in the society, and whenever it fails to respond fast to these trends, the consequences will follow.  

For instance, in the past few years we have seen an uptake in body positive movement and inclusivity. Some brands quickly picked it up, while others refused to listen. And just like that – the famous Victoria’s Secret show had to come to an end and the brand sales started to drop, because they were not able to adapt fast enough to the spirit of the time.

Climate change Vivienne Westwood

Climate change Vivienne Westwood

To define the 2020 zeitgeist, we can use three words: environmental activism, liberation, pandemic. These words might not immediately make you think of fashion, but yet they are what is on many people’s mind, which forces fashion world to yet again adapt and respond.

Environmental activism changes the agenda

 If 1960s changed the world by bringing fast fashion, 2020s are going in reverse by popularising the slow fashion movement. Ever since the documentary “The True Cost” came out in 2015, it has been out in the open: fashion industry is not sustainable. Then 2019 brought us climate change protests with Generation Z becoming a new force expressing their opinions. Now there is no way back from having sustainability on the agenda and fashion industry is quickly filling up with new eco-conscious buzz words, like “recycling”, “upcycling”, “carbon footprint”, “resale”, “ethical fashion”, and many more.

New kind of liberation

Millennials and Generation Z are now getting more and more power in the consumer space, and they are not there not joke around. They are the representatives of a new multi passionate workforce that is often self-employed. This often gives them higher than average disposable income and allows to dictate their own rules. Freedom from the outdated social constructs, strong opinions and readiness to invest more in the brands that they believe in and that have a clear mission are what defines them. And this overarching feeling of freedom is what determines their style choices too.

Facemask

Facemask

Pandemic

The definition of 2020 zeitgeist would not be complete without mentioning the pandemic. Millions of people have been forced to stay home and adjust to a new norm. Many had to start shopping online more, spend more time in tracksuits and homewear, creating a stronger need for clothes to be more comfortable and wearable than ever. The former symbol of air pollution — face masks —  have become our new must-have. And we all have been forced to pause. Reflect. Re-evaluate.

Art Digest: May 11—17

By /ART/, /BLOG/, /NEWS/
Text

Julia Kryshevich

Art Digest: May 11—17

The situation is evolving: while some countries try opening museums and let people visit public places, others don’t rush to cancel the security measures. The only thing that seems to unite us is the awesome spring, no matter what… But wait, we still have online activities — though recently having become commonplace, digital events keep on surprising us by their even more complex and engaging content. And there is something that can be done right away — e.g. enjoying brand new gorgeous artworks by famous artists, listening to podcasts with their participation, getting back in time, exploring fashion collections, and other things. Learn more about the news, events & opportunities of the week below.

Olafur Eliasson launches a new AR project

During COVID-19 quarantine artist Olafur Eliasson has released two digital projects: the first one, “Earth Perspectives” series of artworks was introduced in April as a means of celebrating the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. The recent work Wunderkammer has been launched in conjunction with digital art app Acute Art. The augmented reality project features a collection of 10 sculptures including a sun, a raincloud, and the Northern Lights that can be virtually placed around users’ homes — all of them available for free through the Acute Art app. 

Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson is world famous for using natural elements in his works, integrating them as an immersive installation into some public spaces and galleries. Probably, the most well-known work by EliassonThe Weather Project was first released at the Turbine Hall of Tate Modern in 2003. The visitors of the exhibition could see a huge sun rising, transforming the entire space of the Turbine Hall. However, apart from the mesmerizing light installation, it was the audience who contributed to the process of making art — by contemplating the sun and experiencing the environment. 

Olafur Eliasson: “I always try to make work that activates the viewer to be a co-producer of our shared reality”.

The weather project, 2003

The weather project, 2003

The weather project, 2003

1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair available online

The 1-54 New York 2020 edition of the Contemporary African Art Fair has been postponed, however, thanks to Artsy, visitors can get acquainted with the artworks presented digitally. Until May 31 you are welcome to access the page of the Fair on artsy.net. 180 paintings, 192 fine-art photographs as well as the “Works on Paper” and “Cultural Commentary” categories are waiting for your exploration.

The leading international art fair dedicated to contemporary African art was founded by the Moroccan entrepreneur Touria El Glaoui in 2013. Ever since the fair has been held annually in London, while New York edition appeared in 2015 and Marrakech in 2018. Why 1-54? Simple, there are 54 countries constituting the African continent — whose brightest representatives from the field of art are on display within the innovative platform. The soonest offline edition will take place in the British capital, from October 8—11 with a VIP Preview on October 7. See you at Somerset House at the 1-54 London very soon (meanwhile enjoying the option provided by Artsy).

Contemporary African Art Fair

Contemporary African Art Fair

Contemporary African Art Fair

Yohji Yamamoto remembers his past

The new capsule series by Yohji YamamotoReplica SS96 is meant to revive the brand men’s spring-summer 1996 collection. The Replica line includes four models of jackets with lapels, four pairs of trousers and three shirts that resemble their counterparts from 1996 a lot. “Replica SS96” will be available in Aoyama shop in Tokyo from May 30. The estimated price for one item is between $400 USD and $2,500 USD.

The Japanese designer Yohji Yamamoto gained much fame in the 1980s as an advocate for deconstructivism from the world of haute couture, an avant-garde artist and a rule-breaker. Yohji Yamamoto caught the vibe of the upcoming social and cultural changes, suggesting that women could dress the way men do — relaxed, simple, and yet elegant. His favorite colour has always been black and generally it’s dark basic tones that constitute the brand’s palette. The designer says, he doesn’t really believe in future, but he enjoys retrospecting. That might be a good explanation for his recent decision to create “Replica SS96” series. 

Yohji Yamamoto: “Start copying what you love. Copy copy copy copy. At the end of the copy you will find yourself.

“Replica SS96” Line by Yohji Yamamoto

“Replica SS96” Line by Yohji Yamamoto

“Replica SS96” Line by Yohji Yamamoto

“En Route to New Orleans” by William Eggleston sold for €38,000

The dreamy photo work depicting someone sitting on the plane by the window with a drink, shining under sun was made by the American photographer William Eggleston in 1971. Recently “En Route to New Orleans” has been sold at the auction by OstLicht Gallery (Vienna) at a price of €38,000. It’s a much higher rate than estimated, however, it’s not the limit. Christie’s reports that Los Alamos portfolio by Eggleston (1965-74) was sold for $1,022,500 USD at the auction on October 13, 2008 in New York. 

William Eggleston is famous for having legitimized color photography as a fine art form. Maintaining his curiosity for reality fixing, he implemented the dry language of documentary photography into the genre of the future. Photographs by William Eggleston didn’t win recognition at once, so ridiculously mundane they would appear to the artist’s contemporaries. However, looking at the price of his works today, one might guess that Eggleston managed to leave a mark in the history of photography.  

Untitled (1970). From Dust Bells, Volume II (1965-1974)

Los Alamos portfolio by William Eggleston (1965—1974)

Untitled by William Eggleston (1983-1986)

Listening to Marina Abramovic in the podcast by the Art Newspaper 

The Week in Art podcast brought by the Art Newspaper in association with Christie’s comes out each Friday and tackles the most recent issues of the field. Last time there was a really special release featuring the interview with Marina Abramovic. The topic sounded like: what’s the future of performance in the post-pandemic art world? Considering the general situation with epidemic and specificity of this kind of art (which frequently rests on experiencing the context) it feels so true to listen to the grandmother of performance art, learning about her perspectives on the future.

COVID-19 resources for photographers by LensCulture

And now bonus for photography-lovers! LensCulture editors curated a “list of initiatives, ideas and resources” for all those who can’t imagine their lives without photography — both professionals and amateurs. You can choose from competitions, festivals, educational opportunities, grants, inspirational podcasts and blogs and many other things. The list will be updated weekly. By the way, suggestions and additions from the readers are widely welcomed. Just get your camera ready 🙂

And don’t forget to subscribe

Top 5 Iconic Fashion Photographers: Helmut Newton, Irving Penn, Richard Avedon, Peter Lindbergh, Guy Bourden

By /BLOG/, /FASHION/

Text
L i s a  L u k y a n o v a

Top 5 Iconic Fashion Photographers: Helmut Newton, Irving Penn, Richard Avedon, Peter Lindbergh, Guy Bourden

“My job as a portrait photographer is to seduce, amuse and entertain.“   Helmut Newton

1.Helmut Newton (1920-2004) is an iconic figure, symbolic and influential in the world of photography. Newton was a portraitist, a supporter of classical composition and a follower of the avant-garde trend.

Newton’s work has challenged convention. He was creating characters that would test the limits and provoke the world. Being a photographer bridging the gap between art and commerce, Helmut Newton has always managed to amaze and polarize the public. Newton introduced the liberating light of women as well as repositioning the model standard, incorporating nudity, sexuality and femininity in his black and white photographs. 

Newton’s work is often called cold. The photographer considered each of them as a specific task based on calculation and mastery. This is how he is remembered by the world – the flawlessness of images, professionalism, his own vision of the beautiful and extremely clearly constructed images.

Helmut Newton

Helmut Newton

Helmut Newton

“I can get obsessed by anything if I look at it long enough. That’s the curse of being a photographer.” Irving Penn

2.The American Irving Penn (1917-2009) was one of the greatest photographers of the 20th century. Irwin Penn is a genuine classic, legend and nearly mythological figure who shot almost all the celebrities.

In the mid-80s, Irwin Penn was fond of making extremely extraordinary subject compositions, which have become, as well as his accurate, graphic photo models, the visiting card of the artist. Never was he afraid of showing things on the „ugly“ side. The fruit in his pictures is crushed with his fingers; the background for the huge bee in close-up is the brightly painted woman’s lips on which it places.

His still lifes are stamped with the idea that everything in the world is not eternal, all decays and dies, only the beauty of the moment can be preserved, even when the model loses it. In 1943 he in fact photographed the first and only Vogue still life cover.

Irving Penn

Irving Penn

Irving Penn

“A portrait is not a likeness. The moment an emotion or fact is transformed into a photograph it is no longer a fact but an opinion. ” Richard Avedon

3.Richard Avedon’s (1923-2004)  work impresses with the dynamics, lightness and elegance of its characters.

Avedon’s work is impeccable. His vision eye and composition skills manifest itself when he takes over his object in front of a lens.Most often, the viewer can see that the photos are dominated by an unobtrusive light background, there is an intrusive composition, often the entire picture in black and white tones. However, one still wants to look at the images and scrutinize every detail. In Avedon’s portraits, the model always comes to the fore The uniqueness of the works of Richard Avedon is that in them he discloses the inner world of his characters, makes them special.The portraits of Avedon are full of emotion, individuality and action. In principle, when you look at Avedon’s work – it makes you feel connected and forced by what he has created.  

Some works of the master were not accepted by the public categorically. In particular, the album „American Starfall“ was criticized by many artists immediately after its release. In it, all the photos were taken very realistic, not hiding, but emphasizing wrinkles, folds, age and flaws in the faces of models. However, then all the photographs in this style were described as brilliant and innovative.

Richard Avedon

Richard Avedon

Richard Avedon

“The photographer, even in fashion and portraiture, has to have a standpoint. It’s important to know what you stand for, no? Most people just take pictures but they stand for nothing. They follow trends and don’t know why.” Peter Lindbergh

4.Peter Lindbergh (1994-2019)  is truly one of the most prominent and admired photographers in the fashion world.

Lindberg is regarded as one of the pioneers of natural beauty in glossy, he was an outspoken opponent of Photoshop, and he was also an ardent opponent of selfies, which he considered distorted the true image of the person. Strong, candid and private black and white portraits of Lindbergh keep appearing as some of the best in modern fashion.

Lindbergh used to take black and white photos most commonly because he believed that color was a distraction from the face. Usually things started to go very out of order during the process, and the most challenging task was to stop clinging to the initial idea. Lindbergh worked to keep things new open in his work and was not afraid to take a wrong turn.

Peter Lindbergh

Peter Lindbergh

Peter Lindbergh

“I have never perceived myself as responsible for my images. They are just accidents. I am not a director, merely an agent of chance“ – Guy Bourdin

5.Guy Bourdin (1928-1991) who was born in France in 1928 is most famous for his experimental photography. Mainly working in color, Bourdin was a key member of the French Vogue from 1955 until the late 80s, breaking the line of fashion photography, imagining bold, frequently controversial shots with exceptional modern aesthetics. 

Fashion photographer, who primarily created advertising shots, was able to draw the viewer’s interest to the product sold rather than to attractive models. At the same time, each image was perceived not as a separate scene of life, but as a whole history, which contains the plot and connotation.

Editorial houses that collaborated with Guy, provided him with complete freedom, and he enjoyed this, implementing the most daring intentions. In addition to the glamour shots in his collection you can find rough and, in some places, brutal photos.

Guy Bourden

Guy Bourden

Guy Bourden

Sign up for our newsletter here

Knights 2.0: Universal shielding

By /ART/, /BLOG/

Text
A l e x a n d r a  K h a r k o v s k a y a

Knights 2.0: Universal shielding

Knights 2.0: Universal shielding 

We`ve already written about 3D and monster masks, but modern PPE (personal protective equipment) is being improved. Now health workers offer us a more effective thing to protect the eyes, nose and mouth from Covid-19 infection — a face shield.

If we had been told six months ago that our editors would search for face shields in the browser search bar, we wouldn’t have believed it. But in the new reality, we forced. It seems that man is inevitably going back to the middle Ages, when the use of shields was a tool of protection. Of course, by the end of 2020, we don’t want to be like C-3PO. Of course.

Nastia Pilepchuk

Nastia Pilepchuk

Elements shifted minds

Face shields are reusable transparent screens that cover the face and help prevent infectious liquid (drops) from entering the eyes, nose and mouth. They are usually worn in combination with masks to enhance protection. Moreover, they can easily be produced by 3D printing if the necessary materials are available.w

Face shields protect owners much better from touching their faces and don`t interfere with communication, according to US infectious diseases physician and epidemiologist Michael Edmond. This is especially important for those professions that are closely related to people. Right now we will take off and land to the most incredible types of PPE. Take your multi-passport with you and let’s go!

Puey Quiñones AIRASIA PHILIPPINES

Braniff Airlines

Braniff Airlines

AIR

Stewardesses around the world are already meeting passengers in a new uniform. So AirAsia`s one has already managed to call “chic and sporty” (just look at this elegant white scarf!). The new PPE uniform was designed by Los Angeles-based Filipino designer Puey Quiñones and was officially launched on a recent flight from Bangkok to Manila.

By the way, this “shape of the future “ was predicted by Emilio Pucci in 1965, when he designed the uniform for the crew of the American airline «Braniff Airlines». Of course, Pucci was inspired by space futurism and dreams of picnics on Mars, but not by viral fever. „Before that, most flight attendants were dressed as if they came on a bus from 1925,“ the fashion designer said.

Italian architects and designers MARGstudio, Alessio Casciano Design, Angeletti Ruzza have literally „inflated“ the shields for people who want to return to public post pandemic life. The developers hope that this air protection device won`t become a heavy burden on the face, and will allow a wearer to freely communicate/ eat in the usual way. We think restaurants should take note of this!

Well, some modern artists suggest using more air:

Max Siedentopf “How-To Survive A Deadly Global Virus”

San Kim “inflatable suite”

Alva Design Studio

THE EARTH

Here — on the earth — as elsewhere, there is a hot struggle thanks to PPE. Doctors note that the transparent visor that covers the face should be extended below the chin. And there should be no gap between the forehead and the front of the screen, so that no drops can get inside. Children’s dentists from sunny Spain perfectly manage to combine the pleasant with the useful. Look, even the Incredible Hulk came to the defense with COVID-19!

American designer Joe Doucet designed a shield that could be worn like a pair of sunglasses to make people really want to wear shields. It`s easy to use with integrated arms, so you are not an alien anymore.

For those who want to become an alien and spend a weekend outside of our Solar system, we recommend Shin Murayama with his masks series project „Valhalla“. Perhaps the artist was inspired by images of Japanese soldiers. But in these images we see the primal power and the face of a warrior doomed to Valhalla. Dedicated to fans of Rafiki and Hakuna Matata:

Waving a glove and kissing your visors!
OXOX — PURPLEHAZE

And don’t forget to subscribe

Daily Skincare: Best Routine to Look Young

By /BEAUTY/, /BLOG/

Text
A l e x a n d r a  A z a r o v a

Daily Skincare: Best Routine to Look Young

According to Coco Chanel, ‘Nature gives you the face you have at twenty; it’s up to you to merit the face you have at fifty’. While physical aging is inevitable (at least, for the state of the art science) we still can slow down this distressing process. With a ‘little’ help from the huge cosmetic industry, of course, who are eager to sell to us a whole variety of tubes, jars and pots filled with That Absolutely Indispensable Skincare Product.

In order not to get lost in the vast ocean of ‘magic potions’ (and not to get ripped, also) it’s vital to understand what basic skincare routine is and what products you need for it.

1-2-3 of healthy skin

Our skin is a part of the organism and like any limb of our body requires nutrition. Being an external body organ, it is in constant contact with the environment, collecting all the good and the bad – UV-rays and pollution, fresh air etc. So, the right approach is to wipe off all the dirt first and nourish the clean skin after. We will surely want to protect it from the aggressive environment, in the end. And here we go: daily skincare is based upon these three simple steps.

Step 1. Clean & Exfoliate

Cleanness is a key point to health – and healthy skin, as well. For those who prefer natural look in ‘woke up like this’ style, washing the face with a dab of cleansing foam will be enough. If you are a make-up addict, clean your face more intensely in order to remove all make-up products. That said, intensely doesn’t mean vigorously (or the result of chasing your twenties will be the opposite). Choose a two-step cleansing – first, wipe off the colors with cleansing cream or oil and then wash up with foam.

Tip: While exfoliation is required to eliminate the dead cells of the upper skin layer it’s up to you to decide how regularly you will want it. Depending on your skin type – oily or dry – it can be anything from once a week to every day. In this case opt for mild products, e. g. gels or pastes without hard particles.

Step 2. Moisture & Nourish

Now when we have our face prepared, let’s proceed to care. According to your skin type, season and personal preferences these may be oilier – nourishing – or more watery – moisturizing – milks and creams. Apply uniformly all over the face avoiding eye areas – for this delicate skin there are special products.

Tip: Most western cosmetic manufacturers recommend using lotion or toner first and basic skin milk or cream second. However, in Asia – Japan or Korea – the procedure is inversed: milk, then lotion. Always consult the recommendations of the brand.

Step 3. Protect

Last but not insignificant is protection which also depends on the season. Thicker, oily creams will safeguard your skin in chilly autumns and cold winters, while a UV-screen is a summer must-wear.

By following these simple steps you will ensure maximum care to your face. It does require time and certain dedication but you will still want to look young at your fifties, right?

Sustainable fashion: 5 designers to watch

By /BLOG/, /FASHION/

Text
A l i n a  S t e b l o v s k a y a

Sustainable fashion: 5 designers to watch

It has not been a secret for a while that fashion is one of the least sustainable industries. Pollution, waste, overproduction, poor working conditions – this list can go on, and it does not sound too glamourous.

Nevertheless, this year started with a very strong sustainability agenda. For the first time in many
years designers and brands have been seriously challenged on their plan of action to reduce
environmental impact and introduce sustainable practices, whether they want it or not. And, while some had to become trend followers, there have been real eco-trendsetters as well. These are the designers and brands that have put environment and sustainability at the core of their business, and they are the ones to watch.

Iris van Herpen
Progressive, innovative, forward thinking – this is how you could describe this Dutch designer. Ever since her first show in 2007, she has been experimenting with different forms and materials that could potentially be revolutionary in waste reduction.

Iris van Herpen

Iris van Herpen

Iris van Herpen

Maggie Marilyn
Since the inception of the brand in 2016, the mission of this kiwi designer was “to make a
difference in an industry that was ready for change”. Transparency about the supply chain, ethically sourced or recycled materials, biodegradable packaging are all in the core of this brand. And it all comes packed in a beautiful design.

Maggie Marilyn

Maggie Marilyn

Maggie Marilyn

Kit Willow (Kitx)
Another designer from Down Under with environmentalist approach. Apart from using consciously sourced materials, she has also created a program where she works directly with artisans in India addressing the topic of fair working conditions and equal opportunities.

Kit Willow (Kitx)

Kit Willow (Kitx)

Kit Willow (Kitx)

Stella McCartney
The daughter of Sir Paul McCartney has been the one to watch for a very long time. She challenged the industry from 2001 when she established her brand in 2001 and decided not to use any fur or leather. Ever since, Stella McCartney has been experimenting with recycled materials, innovating the production line and creating products that would be easily recyclable.

Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney

BITE (creative collective)
Scandinavia is another emerging hub for fashion environmentalists and forward-thinkers. Founded in 2016 by four creatives based in Stockholm and London, BITE took a minimalist approach to fashion in an attempt to oppose fast fashion. The brand has a limited collection of only 20 timeless items that are being updated from season to season.

Sign up for our newsletter here

BITE (creative collective)

BITE (creative collective)

BITE (creative collective)