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Art Digest: November 09—15

By /ART/, /BLOG/, /NEWS/
Text

Julia Kryshevich

Art Digest: November 09—15

Whatever the current situation is (yes, it smells like a worldwide epidemiologic crisis with COVID-19 striking hard and showing no signs of stopping), it’s essential to put ourselves together and hope for the best. At least, we should try to — you know, optimists live longer. Catch a selection of some cheering-up, exquisite news. There are many visuals, as usual, for you to enjoy, however, this time they are also in motion 🔥

F A S H I O N 

Christmas campaign by Burberry breaks the ice (in both senses)

Another fashion show, even a digital one, is a blend thing to do, the brand’s creative leaders might have thought and decided to act rather unconventionally. The new Christmas campaign by Burberry is an enthralling video featuring a dance collective (La)Horde, not only performing the choreographed moves but also brilliantly interacting with some falling blocks of ice. Following the famous ‘fight or flight’ principle, dancers either broke the blocks or gracefully escaped from them in the video.

Add to that the generally beloved ‘I’m Singing in the Rain’ by Gene Kelly (which served both as a soundtrack and a scenario for the video campaign) and the spirit of Christmas floating in the air. Gloomy London streets light up with the foretaste of a miracle that all of us await annually. Burberry really put one bullet in the bullseye, playing upon such a glorious feeling that is meant to unite and cheer up people in this time of a year. As for the outfits featured, it’s very Burberriantweed coats and jackets in tartan, and the brand’s signature colors, black, beige, mid camel, birch brown, and a few other shades.

Game On: Louis Vuitton shoots Lea Seydoux for its new cruise collection 

James Bond’s girl in ‘Spectre’ (2015), Beauty in ‘La belle et la bêtea’ (2014), and a mind-blowing blue-haired bisexual in ‘La Vie d’Adèle’ (2013), which was honored with numerous cinema awards including the Palme D’Or A fascinating French actress, Lea Seydoux is the one who perfectly knows the rules of transformation. Even though I’m not in favor of highlighting fashion campaigns featuring celebrities (the very fact of a star-cast doesn’t necessarily make the ad much better), but as for Lea Seydoux’ case posing for Louis Vuitton — I just couldn’t pass by.

Here I’m talking about ‘Game On’, Louis Vuitton’s 2021 Cruise Collection by artistic director of women’s line Nicolas Ghesquière. Seydoux, who, by the way, has become the brand’s new face earlier this year, agreed to star in the 30-second playful video where she shuffles the cards, shows her hands, and seems to be ready to gamble. In other words, the actress plays the campaign topic of game cards and carries the role of 007 woman along the way. No doubt, in ‘Game On’ Nicolas Ghesquière stays true to Louis Vuitton’s legendary manner, showcasing it’s well-known monograph on bags and shoes and clothing. Yet there is a fresh detail — four suits of cards integrated in the design of the collection.

Diane von Furstenberg to design H&M Home collection 

Probably the most famous fast-fashion clothing brand worldwide, Swedish-born H&M wins over shoppers’ hearts not only by smooth supplies and outfits for all tastes, but also for its fascinating collaborations. The idea to mingle mass market clothing and haute couture design isn’t not new but it works, and H&M knows it. Since 2004 the brand has been collaborating annually with such fashion giants as Stella McCartney (2005), Roberto Cavalli (2007), Sonia Rykiel (2010), Balmain (2015), and others. Now it’s time for Belgian designer Diane von Furstenberg to get on stage.

‘With this collaboration, I want people to take charge of their home decor. The only rule I have is that your home should reflect who you are’. (Diane von Furstenberg) 

Yes, the thing is, the new collaboration is not about clothing. It’s cushions, blankets, candles, vases (home accessories, in a word) that Diane von Furstenberg is going to design for H&M very soon. Surely, all the garments will be marked with DVF’s signature prints and patterns, though the latter is probably not the most distinguishing finding by the designer. Von Furstenberg wrote her name in the history of fashion as she created the wrap-dress in 1974. Her interior collection for H&M Home is expected to hit the stores’ shelves in 2021.

J U S T   C U T E 

No food truck tour but still great: Coca Cola’s pre-holiday The Letter campaign 

One more example of a heart-warming Christmas campaign has been recently announced by Coca Cola. This year due to COVID-19 no annual truck tour is possible, the company representatives have noted with dismay. However, that doesn’t cancel any traditional celebrations of the festive season. The new video campaign is called ‘The Letter’. Directed by the Oscar-winning filmmaker Taika Waititi, it features a cosy family story playing out in the lead up to Christmas. 

Not spoiling the ad’s captivating narrative, it might be suffice to tell the main message: give something (for Christmas) only you can give – yourself. So, get ready to give a little cry and feel happy like a child while watching. And special treats don’t end there. The company relaunches its cinnamon flavour for the upcoming Christmas season. The legendary food truck tour might come back next year, the Coca Cola team hopefully states on Twitter

A R T 

Futura Akari: when art renegades from two ages meet

Leonard Hilton McGurr, better known as Futura or FUTURA 2000, is a American rebel from the world of graffiti famous for his abstract approach to ‘bombing’. Born in New York in 1955, Futura underwent a period of illegal street painting in the 70s, landing with numerous exhibitions and world tours along with his artist mates such as Keith Haring, Jean Michele Basquiat, and Kenny Scharf somewhat later. His American-Japanese senior colleague Isamu Noguchi, a sculptor and a designer, made it famous discovering his Akari light sculptures (among other things, of course) around the time Futura was born.

Interestingly enough, Futura’s works on canvas caught the eye of art galleries in the 80s, just when Isamu Noguchi was finishing his creative and life journey (the famous sculptor died in 1988). So what’s the point of this whole story? The NY-based Noguchi Museum is currently presenting an installation of the Akari light sculptures hand painted by FUTURA 2000. While quite a few artists used to paint Isamu Noguchi’s objects at various times, now Futura has set his abstract brush strokes on the group of Akari light sculptures dating from 1952–86. The ‘Futura Akari’ exhibition will run at The Noguchi Museum from November 11, 2020 – February 28, 2021.

P.S. If you enjoy the show and feel like you just can’t get enough art by Futura, check his solo exhibition at Eric Firestone Gallery, which is open until the late December. 

On the cover: Burberry Christmas campaign. Photo: Raphael Pavarotti

Art Digest: November 02—08

By /ART/, /BLOG/, /NEWS/
Text

Julia Kryshevich

Art Digest: November 02—08

For many established artists their creative paths were also the paths of struggle. That would be fair to say of South African LGBTI artist Zanele Muholi as well as Sabine Weiss, who pioneered the ‘humanist’ movement in photography half a decade ago. Those who dare to fight for what is dear and important to their hearts, risk a lot, since it’s hard to be the first, going against the crowd. Yet when the results of such action start to show, there is always more courage and determination. You know, the winner takes it all… 

P H O T O G R A P H Y 

African LGBTI in the lens of Zanele Muholi at Tate 

Hail the dark lioness or Somnyama Ngonyama, Brave Beauties, Being, and Only Half the Picture — the Tate Modern showcases the entire artistic heritage of Zanele Muholi, South African artist and activist.

Starting off on November 05, Muholi’s UK major solo exhibition will feature 260 photographs of Black LGBTI people presented ‘as fellow human beings bravely existing in the face of prejudice, intolerance, and often violence’, according to the artist herself.

Non-binary people and trans women at gay beauty contests, gay couples tenderly spending time together, plus a few other scenes from the lives of LGBTI community, that’s what the lens of Zanele Muholi’s camera has been focused on since the early aughts. The artist refers to photography and film to appeal to social justice and harmony. It’s important, however, that Muholi doesn’t consider her works to be portraying beauty per se, but rather feels the need of documenting realities of people who deserve to be heard <…> and seen’. The exhibition will run until March 07, 2021.

Women in Motion prize by Kering goes to Sabine Weiss

International luxury group Kering has always celebrated women’s power and supported the outstanding female representatives quite for a while. This year the group proceeds with its Women in Motion program initially founded in 2015 at the Festival de Cannes and since then, extended to the fields of photography, art and literature. It’s Sabine Weiss, the 96-year-old photographer with an active social stance, who has won Kering’s Women In Motion photography award in 2020.

Although nearing her 100th anniversary, Sabine Weiss is still engaged in photography. Until the 2000s she collaborated with major editions, brands, and institutions (Vogue, The New York Times, Esquire, to name a few) for fashion shootings, commercials as well as some social campaigns. Born in Switzerland with maiden’s name Weber in 1924, Sabine recognized her passion for photo shooting from an early age. On the rise of her career, which came in the forties, she assisted to German fashion and portrait photographer Willy Maywald. Having married Hugh Weiss in 1950, the aspiring photographer decided to switch to free flight taking on projects as an independent artist. Famous for her black-and-white photographs of street life, Sabine Weiss is usually associated with the ‘humanist’ movement in photography. It’s ordinary people, their everyday experience, emotions, and relations that arouses Sabine’s genuine interest. And that makes her works so special and sincere.

A R T 

Meet two illusionists from Latin-American street culture (they’re twins)

One can call them Brazilian Banksys, yet it makes more sense focusing on the artistic manner of the duo. Otavio and Gustavo Pandolfo aka OSGEMEOS (Portuguese for the ‘twins’) are renowned graffiti artists based in San-Paulo and, yes, they were born the same day in 1974 and look identical. Bringing the spirit of hip hop culture into the art, they create illusionary voluminous works that remind of dreams in colour or illustrations for a magical realism book. No wonder the new exhibition by OSGEMEOS at the Pinacoteca de São Paulo is titled ‘Segredos’ or secrets. 

Seven exhibition rooms filled with vivid compositions include some of their earliest works by the duo inspired by their teenage notebooks. OSGEMEOS grew up in Cambuci, central region of São Paulo, densely inhabited by workers and migrants. At the ‘Segredos’ the twin artists recall the exciting years of childhood that were also full of mystery and strange revelations. Today OSGEMEOS are widely-known for their yellow subjects that usually appear on the buildings facades as murals. If you want to know more about the motifs and characters that preceded the current practice of the duo, the ‘Segredos’ exhibition at the Pinacoteca de São Paulo is right there for you. 

Artworks by Zaha Hadid, Renzo Piano, and Norman Foster to support Beirut’s reconstruction 

Two massive explosions that shook the Port of Beirut in August 2020 turned into a lasting traumatic experience for the entire Lebanese capital. Good thing is that some international support won’t be long in coming. Here I am talking not about the politicians, but the artists community, whose creative energy and recognition has long proved to be an effective means for various kinds of social actions. 

The initiative is called Architects for Beirut, which is a charitable auction to be hosted virtually by the Design Miami fair in the late November. About 60 architectural bureaus all over the world have passed on some artworks and drawings authored by the most talented architects for auction. Among the lots are a lithography by David Adjaye, a one-off sketch by Renzo Piano, and a limited-edition sculpture designed by the late Zaha Hadid. Some works like Stefano Boeri’s ‘Mediterranean Mosaic map’ have been specially created for the fundraising initiative.

F A S H I O N 

Alena Akhmadullina new collection explores Middle East aesthetics 

Russian designer Alena Akhmadullina, the owner of the homonymous clothing brand, has recently presented her second capsule collection. This time it’s all about the Middle East region.
Akhmadullina didn’t only seek inspiration in the Slavic and Eastern cultures, but also searched for some similar features between the two. 

If you at once have noticed plenty of glass beads embellishing the outfits, you were right to do so. According to the designer, the form of the beads symbolizes a stitch, which came as a shaping element for the entire collection. The cross-stitching technique applied as well as the primitive symbolic patterns and basic bright colours stand here for tradition, while the principles of image composition remind of some modern technology units such as the computer screen or the graphics editor. Long dresses and puffed sleeves prevailing in the ‘Middle East’ collection, let alone some fancy hand-made accessories, emphasize the feminine nature of the label.

On the cover: Otavio and Gustavo Pandolfo aka OSGEMEOS at the ‘Segredos’ exhibition at the Pinacoteca de São Paulo

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In Focus: Rachel Papo

By /ART/
Text

Julia Kryshevich

In Focus: Rachel Papo

Born in Columbus, Ohio, Rachel Papo has spent her life in two countries, the US and Israel. Having been shooting since her teenage years, Rachel picked photography to meet her career ambitions and tell other people’s stories. Whether serving in the Israeli Air Force as a photographer or visiting a renowned Russian ballet school, the photographer always knows what to focus on to create an enthralling narrative that would be rather close to life.

From the ‘SERIAL NO. 3817131’. Courtesy of Rachel Papo

The early years of the future photographer were equally shared between the diametrically opposed continents. The US-born Rachel Papo moved to Israel as a child and later entered the Haifa-based fine-arts high-school. On ending her military service in Israel, Rachel returned to the US to proceed with the studies. Completing a bachelor program in Fine Arts from Ohio State University first, then doing a master’s in Photography at the School of Visual Arts, NY, Papo didn’t only coin the necessary skills and professional experience but also gathered some ‘living’ material for her further artistic research.

For example, that was the case with the ‘SERIAL NO. 3817131’ project, which was shot fifteen years later that Rachel Papo ended her military duty in Israel. The photographer came to several Israeli army bases (just like the one where she used to serve herself) to tell the story of girls going through the binding experience of adolescence and social adaptation while doing their service at that time.

From the ‘SERIAL NO. 3817131’. Courtesy of Rachel Papo

Images by Papo in the ‘SERIAL NO. 3817131’ make it clear: neither is a choice for the 18-year-olds. Developing physically and mentally into women, exploring their character and sensuality as well as the world outside coincides with the obligation to become a social unit through paying tribute to the state. Israel is one of the few countries in the world that oblige women to serve in military forces. ‘Learning for life’ can turn either into a beneficial or devastating experience. All you can do is to accept it, live it, and learn your serial number (the only thing you might clearly remember from the period of service a few years later).

From the ‘SERIAL NO. 3817131’. Courtesy of Rachel Papo

Another series by Rachel Papo closely associated with the idea of destiny goes under the title ‘DESPERATE PERFECT’. To portray a cradle of great expectations and a sweatshop of endless efforts, the photographer headed to Saint-Petersburg, Russia. The local Vaganova Ballet Academy has stayed true to tradition ever since it was founded in the middle of the 18th century, moulding top dancers not only for Russia, but the entire world. Hundreds of students are enrolled in the Academy annually, each of them secretly dreaming of becoming another Mathilde Kschessinska, Galina Ulanova, or Rudolf Nureyev (all of them being the former Vaganova graduates).  

From the ‘DESPERATELY PERFECT’. Courtesy of Rachel Papo

Actually, that could be Papo’s destiny, too — had she not given up her ballet lessons at the age of 14. The author put paid to her dancing career after 9 years of practice, having realized in her case the end wouldn’t justify the means. Perhaps for that reason Rachel Papo made an effort to get inside the Vaganova, which is usually not easy for non-students. Her suggestion to shoot the emerging dancers was suddenly well received. The young talents as well as their teachers had nothing against being captured while stretching their legs at the ballet barre or moving gracefully across the stage. Highly aspired, certainly doing their best, Papo’s characters yet seem desperate in their striving for perfection, and that’s what the photographer was mainly focusing on. 

‘The dominant thing in my work is my emotions toward these children. They are under these institutions that they can’t really do anything about… I feel some kind of sadness in those situations.’

(Rachel Papo, on the ‘DESPERATE PERFECT’ project, in the interview with the School of Visual Arts, NY)

From the ‘DESPERATELY PERFECT’. Courtesy of Rachel Papo

The latest major art project by Rachel Papo is different in the sense that she didn’t know much about the research subject right before the shooting. This time the photographer turned her lens to the children who didn’t go to school, being taught in the family environment. She started the ‘HOMESCHOOLED’ series in the 2010s after moving from Brooklyn to Woodstock, NY. Though previously unfamiliar with this upbringing strategy and even finding it suspicious, Rachel Papo started embracing this while focusing her camera on some living examples such as the 5-year-old neighborhood girl named True.

From the ‘HOMESCHOOLED’. Courtesy of Rachel Papo

Initially aiming at exploring different sides of homeschooling as well as the phenomenon itself, Papo was surprised… to be unable to do that. The children were all so different from one another in so many ways, that a common thread would be impossible to detect.’ — told the photographer in the interview with LensCulture. Instead, Rachel Papo focused on the portraits of kids depicting them in the process of relentless creation, research, and joy (the only feature that did seem to unite the characters). Although the ‘HOMESCHOOLED’ proved to be a kind of dramatically new experience for the author, she recalls not being taken aback by it. Previous work with youngsters in the ‘SERIAL NO. 3817131’ and ‘DESPERATE PERFECT’ projects definitely played a part.

From the ‘HOMESCHOOLED’. Courtesy of Rachel Papo

Apart from independent art projects, Rachel Papo also accepts commissions. She usually films dance performances, musicals, and cinema production, paying special attention to behind-the-scenes life. Looking at her photographs of Misty Copeland (December 2019), we are at once captivated by the strength and grace of the dancer, while the images taken at the Youth America Grand Prix Finals (NY) might make some of us experience a dim thrill, so distant yet familiar. No wonder Papo willingly takes on portrait shooting — a talented photographer, she either seeks insightful material or interesting life cases to create a perfect visual story. 

Misty Copeland photographed by Rachel Papo for Dance Magazine. Courtesy of the Artist_

Rachel Papo’s website: rachelpapo.com
Her instagram: @rachelpapo

On the cover: from ‘YOUTH AMERICA GRAND PRIX’. Courtesy of Rachel Papo. 

Vlada „RAMMSTEIN 2.0“

By /ART/

RAMMSTEIN 2.0

art-director, photographer, videographer Vlada @vladarennes  @vladayegor
music Yegor Gavrin @yegorgavrin  @vladayegor
style Masha Borisova @masha_shanhai
style assistant Ulyana Morozova @chocoladkka
makeup artist Alyona Serbina @serbinamua
hair stylist Ekaterina Danilina @danilina_muah
models Aleksey Zuev @zuev.real Yegor Gavrin @yegorgavrin
Ivan Pavlov @van_vein Erik @xadriah @t_modelsagency
Roman Martynov @_romartyn_ 
Roman Chekrenev @romanchellla 

Art Digest: October 19—25

By /ART/, /BLOG/, /NEWS/
Text

Julia Kryshevich

Art Digest: October 19—25

Have you ever noticed that anything lost gets found? No matter how well it was hidden… In fact, quite the opposite — the biggest secrets have a way of getting out. The same is true about the masterpieces — whether hidden, stolen or lost, so many paintings eventually get back to the home collection to the joy of numerous art lovers. That’s exactly the story of Gustav Klimt’s ‘Portrait of a Lady’ that was abducted from the Ricci Oddi gallery 20 years ago. The other discovery of the week is that three top Hollywood actresses are going to be guest narrators at the ‘About Time: Fashion and Duration’ exhibition, which finally takes place at the Met Museum starting from the next week. More on this and the other weekly news in the digest below.

Artist Gustav Klimt, right, with his partner, Emilie Flöge, circa 1910. Photo_ Getty Images_

A R T

‘Portrait of a Lady’ by Gustav Klimt to be displayed after 20 years missing 

Another art heist of the century, news. The collection of the Ricci Oddi gallery (Piacenza, Italy) received back its masterpiece in the beginning of the week. The painting by famous Austrian artist Gustav Klimt titled ‘Portrait of a Lady’ was stolen from the Italian gallery during its reconstruction in February 1997. The investigative authorities had a few versions of the incident, including the one suggesting that people close to the gallery had been involved in the scam. Currently robbers have been identified — the two elderly men confessed to the theft last year right after the limitation period for the crime had expired.

Left, Klimt_s Portrait of a Lady (1916-17)_ and right, the Ricci Oddi gallery in Piacenza. Courtesy of the Ricci Oddi gallery_

To be more precise, the thieves ‘gifted’ the painting to the museum four years ago having placed it in the niche of the gallery wall thickly covered with ivy bushes. It was the local gardener who discovered the work while clearing the wall a year ago. Now the ‘Portrait of a Lady’ is back at the Ricci Oddi gallery and there are big plans for it! Four shows dedicated to the figure of Gustav Klimt will run spanning two years in the institution. The first exhibition runs from November 2020 till March 2021. No doubt, the freshly recovered jewel is going to be in limelight on the display.

Meryl Streep, Nicole Kidman, and Julianne Moore to narrate the upcoming Met exhibition 

The annual exhibition organized by the Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute, which comes as a conceptual sequel of the Met Gala, is a long-awaited event, no doubt. Yet this year we had to await it for too long — instead of traditionally taking place in May, the show starts off in late October lasting till February 2021. No more dwelling on the reasons of the postponement, we would better focus on the event itself. The intriguing topic of the year 2019 (remember it was Camp: Notes on Fashion’) gives a way to the no less interesting ‘About Time: Fashion and Duration’.

From left to right_ Julianne Moore, Meryl Streep, and Nicole Kidman at the 2002 New York premiere of ‘The Hours’. Photo_ Getty Images

Perfectly in line with the Museum’s exhibition policy, the current show promises to be a visual delicacy, equally referring to the worlds of art and fashion. According to the Wendy Curator, Andrew Bolton, the exhibition was designed as a ‘meditation on fashion and temporality — drawing out the tensions between change and endurance, transience and permanence, ephemerality and persistence’. However, the show isn’t only about an image, it’s also about a sound. The soundtrack to the event (if it’s a right word) is based on Virginia Woolf’s novel ‘Orlando’. Hollywood actresses Julianne Moore, Meryl Streep, and Nicole Kidman will voice the abstracts from Woolf’s work, thus creating the auditory background of the display. Why Streep, Kidman, and Moore? Well, if you’ve watched the 2002 film ‘The Hours’ starring the three actresses, you probably know the answer. 

From the display of ‘About Time_ Fashion and Duration’ at Met, May 2020. Photo_ Annie Leibovitz

Shepard Fairey creates US election-inspired posters for Time 

Right after designing an anti-Trump billboard for the Artists United for Change group, street artist Shepard Fairey took over another enlightening job. In light of the upcoming US election on November 03, Fairey decided to assist Time Magazine in encouraging Americans to demonstrate their citizenship. The artist created a cover for the November issue of Time, depicting a woman wearing a bandana as a face covering (a little criticism for those who skip doing that and, consequently, don’t really take their civil liability).

‘Even though the subject in the portrait knows there are additional challenges to democracy during a pandemic, she is determined to use her voice and power by voting’. (Shepard Fairey

The portrait originates from the artist’s 2020 series called ‘Our Hands — Our Future’. Shepard Fairey believes that it’s not only voting that constitutes the bright democratic future, yet casting a ballot is crucial to contribute to this honorable target. Remarkably, never before has Time Magazine removed their masthead from the cover giving space to the artist’s ideas. However, this concession might seem less surprising, bearing in mind that Shepard Fairey collaborates with Time for the third time already.

Artist Shepard Fairey working in his studio. Courtesy of Shepard Fairey _ Instagram_

F A S H I O N 

Nature-inspired S/S 2021 collection by Australian designer Dion Lee 

Even if the word collocation Australian fashion doesn’t ring a bell to you, it’s never too late to learn more. Especially with such talented Australian creatives on radar. The Sydney-born fashion designer Dion Lee established his eponymous brand in 2009. In the same year Lee took part in the Australian Fashion Week and got things rolling rather quickly in his home context. However, his international rise came in 2018, when the Duchess of Sussex Meghan Markle was seen in public wearing one of Lee’s dresses. 

Dion Lee has recently presented his S/S 2021 Ready-To-Wear collection, and it’s quite different from everything that came before under the label’s roof. Focusing on technicality and ‘intelligent sensuality’ (Dion Lee’s expression), the brand usually offers nontrivial, asymmetrical outfits that look bold and sexy. This time apart from sex appeal, the S/S 2021 dresses radiate intimacy and harmony with the world around. Inspired by the warming issue, the collection features organic curves (such as Monstera leaf-shaped leather tops), light natural shades, and sophisticated weaving (knotting, macramé etc). Dion Lee, all eyes on you, curious what’s coming next!

Dion Lee S_S 2021 Ready-To-Wear Collection. Courtesy of the brand

Dion Lee S_S 2021 Ready-To-Wear Collection. Courtesy of the brand

Dion Lee S_S 2021 Ready-To-Wear Collection. Courtesy of the brand

P H O T O G R A P H Y 

Foam Talent Call 2020’ winners announced 

Keen photographers know it firsthand. Organized by Foam Magazine, the annual event has been running for five years, creating opportunities for young and aspiring visual artists. All right, it’s Foam Talent Call. On the table is going on public display as well as having one’s works featured in Foam Magazine. Not bad, right?

The Foam Talent 2020 edition has recently announced the finalists. There are 19 of them, selected out of 1,619 portfolios from 69 countries. The chosen visual artists will showcase their works at Kühlhaus Berlin (Berlin) from 22 October — 1 November, 2020.

Foam Talent 2020 _ From the series ‘Charlie Surfs on Lotus Flowers’. Photo_ Simone Sapienza_

Foam Talent 2020 _ From the series ‘PVC Meatway’. Photo_ Aadesokan

Foam Talent 2020 _ From the series ‘Fire Island Night’. Photo_ Matthew Leifheit

Later on the exhibition will move to Amsterdam. Here are a few sneak picks, if you are sure about your plans to attend the show yet.

Art Digest: October 12—18

By /ART/, /BLOG/, /NEWS/
Text

Julia Kryshevich

Art Digest: October 12—18

Shhh, great news — a new column devoted to fashion in all its manifestations is coming soon. Stay tuned and check our beloved haze.gallery for details. Now it’s time to discuss the most elegant and sudden headlines for this week. 

F A S H I O N

Meet Michael Kors S/S 2021 Ready-To-Wear Collection

It’s been almost a month since New York Fashion Week came to an end. American designer Michael Kors is finally ready to showcase the brand’s Spring/Summer 2021 Ready-To-Wear collection, and it’s about a digital show again. Michael Kors inclines to reduce the number of fashion shows to 2 per year, finding October a perfect time to reveal the upcoming season trends.

‘People are just seeing the fall clothes for the first time in stores. Why are we showing them the spring clothes before they’ve even seen the fall ones?’the designer exclaims. 

As for the recent S/S 2021 Ready-To-Wear collection, it might be rightfully called ‘Dress comfortable to feel yourself confident’. Warm light shades, demi-season fabrics (in the sense that the outfits are suitable for wearing not only on the beach), in a word, smart casual in the best possible way. Kors stays true to his manner and prefers acting independently. The result? Judge for yourself, it’s straight ahead. 

Michael Kors S_S 2021 Ready-To-Wear Collection. Courtesy of Michael Kors

Michael Kors S_S 2021 Ready-To-Wear Collection. Courtesy of Michael Kors

Michael Kors S_S 2021 Ready-To-Wear Collection. Courtesy of Michael Kors

First commercial by Felipe Oliveira Baptista for Kenzo presented 

Remember the Kenzo latest Bee a Tiger’ collection presented at PFW? The brand’s new creative director Felipe Oliveira Baptista has opted to pursue the story unveiling his first commercial campaign for Kenzo. Yes, the leitmotif for the ‘Going Places’ campaign is great uncertainty, consequential confusion, and… a window of opportunity.

Initially Felipe Oliveira Baptista planned to go to his native Azores to film for the new campaign, but the pandemic made him change the shooting location for New York and Los Angeles. For the ‘Going Places’ he collaborated with his long-term partner stylist Jane How and iconic fashion photographer Glen Luchford. The concept of the shooting also belonged to Luchford: Baptista’s team selected images from the photographer’s archives, while Glen tried shooting Kenzo models in the same pose and under the same light as in the old pictures. The mannequins were wearing the label’s Fall-Winter 2020 collection, radiating the spirit of youth, traveling, and constant search, just in line with the philosophy of the brand. Baptista seems to be a genuine successor of Kenzo Takada’s ideas. Very regrettably, the founder of the fashion empire died on October, 04, here we recall the life and the creative path of the genius.

D E S I G N 

Pantone and Globe reveal new series of colourful decks 

If you’re a regular reader of our column, you might remember us talking about Pantone Colour Institute quite a few times, the last time was just recently. However, Pantone doesn’t get tired of surprising all those who are in love with the colour. This time the Institute pursued a successful collaboration with the skate brand Globe releasing a unique series of collectible decks (colourful, as you might guess). 

Each box set from the new series features five 8.25″ decks made from Canadian marple and painted in line with the Pantone Colour Of The Year 2021 palette. Among the colors are Classic Blue (2020), Living Coral (2019), Ultra Violet (2018), Greenery (2017), and Tangerine Tango (2012). If you are looking forward to purchasing the product, keep in mind that the edition is limited. The first batch has been already sold out, the release date for Box Set 02 is November, 06. Learn more on the Globe website

Photo_ @danpreston_1_Hypebeast

Photo_ @danpreston_1_Hypebeast

Photo_ @danpreston_1_Hypebeast

A R T 

The other Warhol: discover early photographs of the King of Pop Art 

Does the figure of Andy Warhol attract your interest? In any aspect, I mean, either as a bright phenomenon of pop culture or an artist/producer/rule breaker from the world art whose extraordinary fate had probably outperformed any of his life expectations. The latter can be easily explored with the help of the related projects, archives, and memories of Warhol’s colleagues. The photographs of the thirty-something-year-old artist shot by David McCabe is a good example.

In 1964 David McCabe was just 24. The aspiring photographer left his hometown Leicester and crossed the Atlantic to hitch a jackpot (as he would find out later). A relatively unknown illustrator and wannabe artist named Andy Warhol was looking for an assistant to document his life. Back then McCabe had no idea who Andy was, neither he realized it was a carpe diem moment, yet he took the chance. Over the year David followed Warhol to parties and exhibitions and just everywhere the client would go to make more than 2,500 images… and put them aside.

The thing is Andy Warhol had spread his wings and changed his image from a timid amateur to a local celebrity by 1965. In his lifetime Warhol wouldn’t come up with any idea what to do with the images — perhaps the artist’s renown hesitation was the reason (McCabe recalls Andy Warhol really bothered what he looked like in the eyes of the others). Four decades passed. David McCabe selected ⅕ of the photographs taken in the far 1964 and published a book under the title ‘A Year in the Life of Andy Warhol’ in 2003. Today some of the works are on sale through Proud Galleries with McCabe himself talking to Dazed Digital about his early (and such an extraordinary) acquaintance with the King of Pop Art.

About ‘Luxes’: New exhibition at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs 

What do you know about luxury? That could have been a seducing motto for another commercial of perfume or jewelry. But no, ‘Luxes’ is the theme for the new exhibition at the Parisian museum of Decorative Arts or Musée des Arts Décoratifs. Until May 2, 2021 you are welcomed to investigate the essence of what’s called precious. More than 100 objects on display brought from different parts of the world ideally match such categories as beautiful, rare, and exceptional — all those that constitute the idea of luxury.

Yet the artifacts featured don’t have much in common at first blush — Old Egyptian attributes of divine worship, gold-detailed Chinese porcelains from the XVIII century, and even a Cartier clock (1927). Ah yes, also a Little Black Dress by Chanel and outfits from the Christian Dior Cruise 2020 collection. That’s the thing — the organizers of the exhibition don’t only showcase subjects that are (used to be) deemed ‘lux’ but also trace the evolution of the concept. That makes the project so ambitious and spectacular.

‘From ecology to diversity, luxury will become increasingly less material and the idea of experience — discovery, individual reflection, and one’s own definition of luxury — will become the emphasis in tomorrow’s world.’ (Olivier Gabet, curator of the ‘Luxes’ exhibition)