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PATRICIA TEIJEIRO „wear it and pose“

By /FASHION/

WEAR IT AND POSE

PHOTO AND ART DIRECTION PATRICIA TEIJEIRO @pixie_photographs
FASHION PATI SIRÉ @patriciasire
MAKE UP & HAIR CRISTINA GAVIRA @crissmakeupartist
MODEL ADJI NGONE @adjivog from WILD MANAGEMENT @wildmgmt
PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT ANABEL ZAMORA @anabel_f.zamora
PRODUCER MARI ARENAS @mariarenas15
LOCATION LA INFAME @lainfamestudio
María Ávila for That ́s My Closet Showroom @mariaavilamoda
Patricia Siré designer @patriciasire
Redondo Brand @redondobrand
Paloma Barceló @palomabarcelo
Asos @asos
Magpie Vintage Clothes @magpievintageclothes
Artist and Fleas Williamsburg @artistandfleas
Parfois @parfois
Mango @mango

MBFW Russia: How It Was This Time (Part 2)

By /BLOG/, /FASHION/, /NEWS/
Text

Julia Kryshevich

MBFW Russia: How It Was This Time (Part 2)

In the previous part we’ve started reviewing trends spotted this season at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Russia, which ran phygitally from October 19 till 23. Having figured out how new femininity and gender fluidity are mirrored in the designers collections, we are proceeding with the rest of the trends. 

F U T U R E    I S    C O M I N G

Humankind has always wondered what the future might look like. While many of us tend to have a more positive vision of tomorrow, some highly sensitive and thinking individuals like artists and scientists often suggest their anti-utopian views. One thing’s for sure, whether wonderful or terrible, the future will be different (and it will never reach our minds). Nevertheless, it’s so exciting to think how things can be. Why not daydream? 

N.Legenda

Designer Olga Kapitonova, the founder of N.Legenda, suggests that the future is already here. At least, the models walking the runway at N.Legenda latest fashion show made us think we’re ready to go into outer space. No, they didn’t wear any space suits, but the colours featured — corrugated silver, metallic petrol, and galaxy blue — created the right sci-fi futuristic look. Tunics, suits, coats, and jackets from the N.Legenda SS 2021 collection are also rather agender, which broadens the scope for experiments.

Participants of ‘Fashion a la Russe’ project 

Participants of the Krasnodar-based ‘Fashion a la Russe’ project boldly forecasted the vogue trends for the upcoming season. Kazakova Olga suggests that attached decorative prints ideally match flower frocks (some heavy boots like grinders are preferred so that the entire look doesn’t look fruity). Klimovskikh Valeria (KLIMOVSKIKH) prefers adding mysterious symbolic elements to the outfits, while Nadezhda Belousova (ValNa Fashion) bets on the hand-crafted capes that resemble a fishing net. 

B&D Institute 

All new is well overlooked past, everybody knows it. So to come up with fresh ideas in fashion you’d better ‘confer’ with some acknowledged couturiers. Just like the students of the Moscow Institute of Business and Design (B&D) did. Inspired by the figure of Alexander McQueen, his aggressive and vulnerable, romantic and passionate, and just extraordinary manner, they created a series of controversial and highly stylish outfits made from the biodegradable material. ‘What does the future of fashion look like?’ — the B&D students ask the viewer and immediately respond. ‘It’s hardly possible to explain. Just watch’. 

LOKOTO

The motto for the new collection by LOKOTO could be: ‘Future’s not everybody’. In line with the early 20th century avant-garde artists, Lena Anikeeva, ex graphic designer and LOKOTO’s CEO, decided to cut off the extra to prepare for the bright future. Just three colours of the basic palette chosen (red, black, and white), direct lines, and clear geometrical shapes — the recipe for success seems easy. Lena Anikeeva finds that clothes are like architecture — it’s the silhouette and convenience that are of primary importance. And we couldn’t agree more. 

kØd

Another version of the future a la avant-garde belongs to the Ukrainian-born brand kØd (Dutch for ‘flesh’). The latest collection of the brand stands out through a series of careful red stitches, thorough colour selection (the trio chosen by LOKOTO plus blue), and unexpected accessories. So, forward into the future, with some flowers in your hand? 

T R I U M P H   O F   T H E   C O L O U R

Spring and summer periods seem the perfect time to dress brightly. Sounds easy, doesn’t it? Yet just a few of us dare to express themselves through an intense colour palette. Taking an example from some fashionistas might help. 

1377

Ode to colour green in the new collection by 1377. Although newly-minted (tailor Sasha Zhurina founded 1377 three years ago in Volgograd), the brand regularly takes part in major fashion events worldwide such as Paris, Shanghai, and Tbilisi Fashion Weeks. The upcoming spring promises to be enchanting with a broad green colour spectrum suggested by the designer: emerald, pistachio, pine, moss, sea green etc. Loose shirts and coats and jackets emphasize the laid-back mood of the collection, while the only female mannequin featured shows 1377 is a menswear brand (rather unisex at heart, though).

TSIGANOVA and Konyukhov Art

Victoria Tsiganova is not only a prominent singer, but also a designer. Her latest collection has been issued in collaboration with the famous Russian traveler Fyodor Konyukhov, who just like many gifted people has various genii. Apart from traveling, Fyodor creates paintings, which inspired TSIGANOVA to set up a very colourful vivacious series devoted to his art. The designer isn’t afraid of bold combinations of colour and styles, she also generously embellishes her outfits with prints and patterns. That’s how an artist’s imagination might probably look like.

Annais Yucra 

The Peru-based designer Annais Yucra names herself an ‘artivist’. In her collections she calls for freedom of artistic expression and raises social issues. The SS 2021 by Annais Yucra is built upon colour blocking principles, yet the colour palette engaged is the very definition of tenderness. All shades of marshmallows are featured in the garments, while the cuts either follow the body shape or flirtatiously conceal it. 

Maison Kaleidoscope 

Taking on the role of a jungle dweller? Only green lights with the new collection by Maison Kaleidoscope. Fabrics from different parts of the world such as Egyptian cotton, Italian viscose, and Australian wool fed into the wild animal kingdom with every kind of flamingo, cobra, cheetah, and tiger present. No, it looks nothing but a masquerade, no exaggeration here. Just elegant facetious looks moderately spiced with spots-and-stripes prints, feathers, and embroidered fauna silhouettes. Trends spotted: highly-set cloche hats from the 1920s and woolen balaclavas.

B A C K   T O   T H E   R O O T S 

A few Yakut designers are on the list at MBFW this time. Together with some other couturiers they willingly show their belonging, praising the native cultural practices and making them available to the wider public. Finding inspiration in the local is a new auspicious trend, which is clearly manifested in different fields of visual arts (fashion is no exception).

Marfa Fedorova

Returning to the roots in the view of Yakut designer Marfa Fedorova initially means getting closer to nature. Reminiscing about the beauty of home boreal forests, Marfa Fedorova introduces purely natural hues within her new collection: e.g. sky blue, pine, sandstone, and clay. If it’s a choice, just loose cuts are preferred. And the sweetest ushanka-hats in tow. 

050

‘саһарҕа’ (Yakut for ‘sunrise’) is the first collection by the brand 050 to be performed on the principles of upcycling. Old vintage fabrics have formed the basis for a series of mostly snow-white authentic garments. Much focus on details plus unusual tricks like tied-up ribbons instead of shoes on feet. ‘Culture keeps on thriving, rebirthing out of the previous forms of life’ — so goes the 050 statement.

SOLKO

Another Yakut brand SOLKO doesn’t get stumped by the work-life balance issue. The new collection by SOLKO features smart dresses, raincoats, skirts, and suits that a woman can wear both for work and leisure. Warm intense shades of the garments together with a ‘frosty’ makeup (apple cheeks, red lips, and white skin) enhance the vigor and decisiveness of the owner. Shirt collar is a new trend.

LES by Lesia Paramonova

A completely different vision of the call of nature was presented by designer Lesia Paramonova. Her brand ‘LES’ (Russian for ‘forest’) went pagan this season paying special attention to rituals. Images of birds symbolize freedom and cohesion of matter and spirit, while beads on bag handles might attract good fortune. The colour palette is no less exciting: cold hues like blue and gray stand for water, while warm and tender ones embody spring and warmth and blossoming flowers.

That’s it for now. See you at the next MBFW in spring 🙂 

All photographs provided by the press-office of Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Russia

Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Russia: How It Was This Time

By /BLOG/, /FASHION/, /NEWS/
Text

Julia Kryshevich

Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Russia: How It Was This Time

Right before we start, let me remind you of the basics. Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Russia or MBFW, for short, is a major fashion event in Russia, CIS, and EMEA (at least, under the version of the organizers), which happens biyearly, in spring and in autumn. 

If you managed to join the April 2020 season of the Fashion Week, you could see what a success it was: although entirely running online, the three-day event attracted about 830,000 spectators. Therefore, moving the program online proved to be a natural solution for MBFW promoters in October. However, almost half of the fashion shows this time took place physically at 8 Moscow venues. No, excluding the main one, Moscow Manezh, situated a stone’s throw from Red Square. Still there were some interesting locations like Moscow Museum of Fashion and the spacious ‘Nadezhda’ loft in the historically significant city trade district.

To attend the shows you as a fashion lover or a buyer or a journalist (whatever) needed an invitation, signing a verbal promise to comply with the preventive measures against COVID-19. If you more felt like staying at home and having settled yourself comfortable enough, watching an online stream, it was a massive hit, too. High-quality videos of the shows, including close-up shots and backstage footage were available to the guests through various platforms such as the official website of MBFW and the Russian popular social network VK. Another attractive option was to view some additional news and entertaining content provided by the fashion influencers, stylists, and other folks from the local world of vogue via TikTok.

So back to MBFW program. 74 designers from six countries showcased their collections in the autumn edition of the event, including the US, the UK, Argentina, Peru, and Indonesia. As for the Russian part, it wasn’t just Moscow-driven. Saint-Petersburg, Krasnodar, Sochi, and Yakutsk have proudly presented their natives (and hosted the fashion shows themselves). This season of MBFW was mostly about clothes — the only exception that comes to mind was the Brevno eyewear brand, which showed the step-by-step process of the goods manufacturing in a video presentation. Such major figures of the Russian fashion industry as Igor Chapurin (CHAPURIN) and Elena Souprun (ELENA SOUPROUN) were on the list together with some aspiring undergraduates of the HSE Art and Design School and the B&D Institute, both Moscow-based. In order to support young professionals under the economic recession MBFW organizers enabled 13 labels to take part in the event without paying any entrance fee. So there was no shortage in young up-and-comers this time.

Though relatively young, Russian fashion industry is worth maintaining one’s focus on it. While some couturiers prefer mimicking European fashion trends (successfully, I must say), others decide on demonstrating the authenticity of the Russian DNA and focus on symbolism and national motifs. I wouldn’t like to talk in general terms (it’s hardly possible even less), however, some trends can be spotted. Here are a few insights of what Russian fashion industry breathes today. 

PART 1 

N E W   F E M I N I N I T Y

Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Russia has never divided its seasons into male and female collections. Not that gender-fluid clothing was widely spread in Russia (quite the opposite, it’s just on the up — more on that later), but femme fashion is still considered the prevailing one. So it’s the male outfits that usually accompany women’s fashion shows, and not vice versa. In that light it’s not a big wonder that the issue of femininity remains relevant. Who is she, the ideal woman? Sounds Jungian and utopian, but always excites people’s minds. This is how MBFW’2020 participants see the answer to this question. 

The name of Elena Souprun’s SS 2021 collection Bricolage’ speaks for itself. Just like the process of bricolage implies creating objects using different kinds of materials found, the new collection by ELENA SOUPRUN displays perfect integration of local motifs into a modern image. Chinese silk and moiré and Uzbek national adras fabrics formed the basis of the label’s outfits. Loose shirts, broad sashes, laidback palazzo-pants, and kimonos call for a careful selection of handmade accessories. Smells like East? Yes, but it’s also about the spirit of the Zeitgeist, independence, and infinite elegance

‘Bricolage’ SS 2021 Collection by Elena Souprun. Courtesy of the brand

‘Bricolage’ SS 2021 Collection by Elena Souprun. Courtesy of the brand

‘Bricolage’ SS 2021 Collection by Elena Souprun. Courtesy of the brand

K Titova’s latest fashion show might serve as a perfect example of conceptual completeness. Creative and self-aware women will enjoy stylish and practical garments by K Titova ingeniously performed in two colors only, blue and white. Plaids, patches, and flower silhouettes complete the image without overloading it. A bit off the point, a senior model was spotted walking the runway during the label’s fashion show. And that’s admirable!

‘Gardens of Secrets’ by K Titova. Courtesy of the brand

‘Gardens of Secrets’ by K Titova. Courtesy of the brand

‘Gardens of Secrets’ by K Titova. Courtesy of the brand

Maison Esve decided to go artistic. Gloss, fringe, embroidered cardigans, and flirtatious skirts — the atmosphere of the 1920s has been perfectly retrieved. In the SS 2021 collection Maison Esve suggests its admirers to take on the role of the world-famous dancer Josephine Baker. But overall, it’s all about being spontaneous, open-minded, and enjoying life as it is.

Maison Esve SS 2021 collection. Courtesy of the brand

Maison Esve SS 2021 collection. Courtesy of the brand

Maison Esve SS 2021 collection. Courtesy of the brand

In the mood for something romantic? Then LUBOVI Naissanse’ collection will tune you in right. Light shadows, transparent fabrics, pleated skirts, and fitted shapes create such a tender image of the ambassador of love and affection. What’s more down-to-earth but yet enjoyable, most LUBOVI garments are created from natural fabrics such as wool, cotton, and silk. By the way, the label’s title as well as the name of its founder Lubov translates from Russian to ‘love’. 

KISSELENKO 

Having taken a step in this direction together with ELENA SOUPRUN, we keep moving forward to the East. ‘Collection №47’ by KISSELENKO is nothing but an homage to oriental delicacy. 50 shades of black used in the outfits (I’m talking about anthracite, quartz, coal, and other rock hues) are counterbalanced with red lips and flawlessly white faces of the mannequins. The makeup of the models together with the high rolls on their heads leave no doubt: the story is about a geisha, but a contemporary one. She lives at the rhythm of the city and makes time for herself. Magnificent and laconic,Collection №47’ comes in line with the philosophy of the brand, which may be described as intellectual freedom of expression. Founded by the designer Lilia Kisselenko in St. Petersburg 20 years ago, KISSELENKO was named the best Russian fashion brand by Vogue in 2000.

‘Collection №47’ by KISSELENKO. Courtesy of the brand

‘Collection №47’ by KISSELENKO. Courtesy of the brand

‘Collection №47’ by KISSELENKO. Courtesy of the brand

G E N D E R   F L U I D I T Y

Unisex ready-to-wear garments have no longer been a wonder as a kind of way station between female and male fashion. But what about rewriting the history of vogue, enrobing men in outfits traditionally ascribed to women and the other way round? It’s the young designers who usually enjoy experimenting with gender in their collections. The results might be astonishing.

‘HARD 008’ by HSE Art and Design School

Fashion Department students of the HSE Art and Design School (Moscow) showed up at MBFW with their ‘HARD 008: THE EDGE OF SOMETHING NEW’ collection. Just as the title suggests, the new series is aimed at reminiscing about the past and coming up with new ideas for the future. Trench coats, T-shirts, and tops are featured both on male and female models being photographed in couples. Asymmetry, long trains, and discreet palette of colours define the spirit of the HARD 008’ outfits. 

The Case Project by Marina Aleksashina_HSE Art _ Design School

The Case Project by Marina Aleksashina_HSE Art _ Design School

The Case Project by Marina Aleksashina_HSE Art _ Design School

SERGEI SYSOEV 

Meanwhile we keep on redefining fashion processes together with the Saint-Petersburg-based couturier Sergei Sysoev. The SS 2021 Ready-to-Wear collection by SERGEI SYSOEV isn’t just about dressing men and women in similar costumes that are marked by intimacy and sophistication. It’s also about the changing role of colour that loses its gender specificity. Intense magenta, noble navy blue, tender aqua marine — these shades are beyond the binary thinking and always ad rem. All you have to do is to get creative and match the colours properly. Bear in mind, such elements as tai dai and artistically designed rose-shaped prints will prevent the outfit from looking repetitive.

KRUZHOK

‘MOM’ collection by KRUZHOK is one of the bravest examples of gender fluidity demonstrated at the current MBFW season. It’s the superhuman with the distinctive feminine traits that serves as a prototype for the new collection. The colour palette is all lightness: peach, pistachio, and creamy hues. Large pockets, accented shoulders, A-line, and pencil skirts. Back to the 60s with its baby-doll image? Yes, in a way, and men can wear it!

‘MOM’ Collection by KRUZHOK. Courtesy of the brand

‘MOM’ Collection by KRUZHOK. Courtesy of the brand

‘MOM’ Collection by KRUZHOK. Courtesy of the brand

GILVICHUTE 

Having prior discussed new femininity, it would be fair to talk of men. Designer Yana Gilvichute devotes her new series to the wild 90s (at least, in Russia they were like that, with a highly unstable Perestroika period). GILVICHUTE SS 2021 plays upon the well-known taste of confusion and nascent freedom. Unisex leather coats are still the historically established classic, while male bodysuits, jabots, and puffy sleeves promise to be another sensation, experimental and romantic at once. It would be hard to avoid the choice of color: excellently light blue, it reminds of the times when the dreams and hopes were as endless as the sky. 

GILVICHUTE SS 2021 Ready-To-Wear. Courtesy of the brand

GILVICHUTE SS 2021 Ready-To-Wear. Courtesy of the brand

GILVICHUTE SS 2021 Ready-To-Wear. Courtesy of the brand

To be continued in Part 2. 

*All photographs provided by the press-office of Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Russia

Ekaterina Maltseva „alchemy“

By /FASHION/

ALCHEMY

Photographer — Ekaterina Maltseva @rina_m_ph
Style&set design — Anastasia Tumanova @art.stasia
MUAH — Danya Che @danya.che_mua
Model — Dzera @dewydim @genom_mgmt

Body H&M; Skirt Prada; Mules D&G; Necklace stylist’s own; Cuff Nullum

Bra Weekday; Skirt Collusion; Coat Vintage; Mules Zara; Earrings Weekday; Cuff Nullum

Body H&M; Skirt Prada; Mules D&G; Necklace stylist’s own; Cuff Nullum

Dress H&M; Shoes Gucci; Tights Calzedonia; Earrings Weekday; Cuff Nullum

Body H&M

Alena Lorea „defiant child“

By /FASHION/

DEFIANT CHILD

Makeup Artist/Hair Stylist: Bianca Vogelmann @bv_makeup_styling
Model: Chiara Becker @Elf Model Management @c.hiarasophi.a
Creative Director/Photographer: Alena Lorea @alenalorea
Assistant: Maria Janjetov @mrjnjtv

Top: Worlford; Underwear: Chantelle; Pyjama Ralph Lauren; Shoes Hunter

Top: Worlford; Underwear: Chantelle

Blazer: Zamin Derafshi Caracuels; Shoes: Roger Vivier customized by Zamin Derafshi Caracuels

Blazer: Zamin Derafshi Caracuels; Top: Worlford

Paula Da Silva „let it be“

By /FASHION/

LET IT BE

Art Direction: Paula Da Silva @dasilvapaula
Photographer/Stylist: Paula Da Silva @dasilvapaula
Designer: Larisa Calin @_larlinn Ana Sekularac @anasekularac Juliana Martejevs @julianamartejevs
Beauty: Imogen Hollands @makeupby_immy
Hair: Marta Martineau @marta.martineau
Models: Karren Jis @karrenjis1 Sonia Lobodiuk @sonilobodiuk

Blue Dress by Juliana Martejevs

White dress by Anna Sekularac

White dress by Larisa Calin

White dress by Anna Sekularac

Glasses from Primark

Bo Bannink „lost in yesterday“

By /FASHION/

LOST IN YESTERDAY

Photography: Bo Bannink www.bobannink.nl, @bobannink
Styling: Ellen Uyen @ellenuyen
Model: Teresa Shimahara @teresa_neotokyo888

Dress: Laura Gerte laura_gerte, Underdress: The Publisher thepublisherberlin

Jumpsuit: Damur @damurfashion

Jumpsuit: Laura Gerte; Jumpsuit: Shannen Maria Samuel @shannenmariasamuel

Jumpsuit: Laura Gerte, Headpiece: The Publisher; Dress: Trashy Treasure @trashyxtreasure, Shoes: Laura Gerte

Danil Lavrovski „autumn red“

By /FASHION/

AUTUMN RED

Photographer: Danil Lavrovski @d_lavrovski
Fashion stylist: Kate Housh @katehoush
Styling assistant: Sophie Napen @sophienapen, Lauryn Vanhaverbeke @laurynfromtheblock, Guusje Erens @guusebumps
Make up artist: Lili Glavan @liliglavan
Make up assistant: Kyria Cateau @kyriamua
Hairstylist: Steven Versees @stevenversees
Models: Sokhna Niane @sokhnaforreal @exaucer.ntela @immbxl

Shirt: Feng Chen Wang; Jumpsuit & shoes: Walter Van Beirendonck
Shirt, top & Pants: Matteo Neri-Lindfors; Collar: Matteo Neri-Lindfors; Shoes: Tabitha Ringwood; Pants: Daily Paper; Shoes: Walter Van Beirendonck
Coats and shoes: Walter Van Beirendonck; Pants: Daily Paper; Chains: Asos; Coat: MMRMS Studio; Pants: Daily Paper; Shoes: Walter Van Beirendonck; Chains: Asos
Leather suit: Feng Chen Wang; Shoes: Tabitha Ringwood; Coat: MMRMS Studio; Pants: Daily Paper; Shoes: Walter Van Beirendonck; Chains: Asos;

Coat: MMRMS Studio; Jumpsuit: Walter Van Beirendonck

Jacket & Pants: Daily Paper; Shoes: Tabitha Ringwood

Lyuba Lukashenko „ethno“

By /FASHION/

ETHNO

Photo: Lyuba Lukashenko @lukashenko_l
Make-up & hair: Nellie Dzhikiya @nellie.dzh
Style: Helga Dubrovska @helgahelgapainter
Model: Inna Stryzhak @strizhinna
Model agency: One Mother Agency @onemotheragency

dress: forma.concept @forma.concept, pants: h&m, shoes: birkenstock.

cap: vintage, sweater: zara, shirt: zara, pants: yves saint laurent, gumboots: delta plus; undershirt: zara, hat: norfin, suit: yves saint laurent;

dress: zara, accessories: Mary Elle, headscarf: vintage;

undershirt: zara, hat: norfin, suit: yves saint laurent; dress: zara;

bag: forma.concept @forma.concept, pants: h&m, shirt: zara, shoes: birkenstock;