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ANNA LUNA ASTOLFI „INTRINSIC LIGHTS“

By /FASHION/, /NEWS/

INTRINSIC LIGHTS

CREATIVE DIRECTOR: PAOLA PORCARELLI – @paolaporcarelli_
STYLIST: PAOLA PORCARELLI
PHOTOGRAPHER: ANNA LUNA ASTOLFI – @annaluna.astolfi
MUA: SILVIA FUGGI – @silvia.fuggimakeup
MODEL: ANGELINA XIFRO – @axifro
HAIRSTYLE: FRANCESCO GAROFALI

SIRIA SCORRANO

GIULIA RIVELLINO – @giumood

MARTA CECCARONI – @marta.ceccaroni_designer

ELLA PERROTTA – @ellaperrotta

MATTEO CESAROTTI E NICOLA MINOTTI – @matteo_cesarotti, @nicola.minotti_4

MATTEO CESAROTTI E NICOLA MINOTTI – @matteo_cesarotti, @nicola.minotti_4

FEDERICA FUSCO – @federicafusco.it

Tatiana Adamova „Daughter of Aphrodite“

By /FASHION/, /NEWS/

Daughter of Aphrodite

Makeup Artist: Valeriya Azarenko @azarenko_mua
Wardrobe Stylist: Svetlana Litvinova @litvinova_st
Model: Vi Kolodko @vi_kolodko
Photographer: Tatiana Adamova @kada.l
Hair Stylist: Viktoriia Kalashnikova @kalashnikova.hairstyle

corset Sonya Tikhonova;skirt You Wanna

corset Sonya Tikhonova;skirt You Wanna

corset Grace Boutique;skirt You Wanna;shoes Zara;shirt H&M;dress Sonya Tikhonova

Bra Shiny;skirt One Store;earrings Belova Jewellery

corset Sonya Tikhonova;skirt You Wanna

Marie-Lisette „American football with MARK BRYAN“

By /FASHION/, /NEWS/

American football with MARK BRYAN

Photographer: Marie-Lisette @marielisette_
Art Direction: Cropp Studios @croppstudios
Stylist: Elena Shylina @elena.shylina
Producer: Polina Sherrif @make_up_stylist_berlin
Styling Assistant: Sylvia Lecybyl @sylvionfire
Photography Assistant: Ing-Marie Ruxton @ingamarietekukwitha
Retoucher: Katerina Malinskaya @malinskaya_retouch
Trikot, shoulder pads und ball models own Skirt neon pink Bibi Bachtadze Boots Jimmy Choo; Turtle neck black Hugo Boss Shoulder pads models own Skirt neon pink Bibi Bachtadze Boots black Jimmy Choo
Knit blue dress & leather jacket Mar- cell von Berlin Pullover green Tommy Hilfiger; Blazer beige Tommy Hilfiger Turtle neck beige Hugo Boss Cardigan off-white Wood Wood Skirt brown Joseph Heels Jimmy Choo
College Jacket & shirt Hollister Pullover green Marques‘ Almeida Skirt Joseph Heels Jimmy Choo Tights Hedoine; Overshirt brown 7 for all Mankind x N°21 Turtle neck brown Wrangler Leather skirt Ambush
Dark blue jacket Lemaire Cardigan white Wood Wood Turtle neck brown Wrangler Skirt und tights Gucci Heels Jimmy Choo
Blazer pink Marcel Ostertag Turtle neck black Hugo Boss Leather skirt Nanushka Boots black Jimmy Choo

Interview with Mark Bryan

By /FASHION/, /INTERVIEW, /NEWS/

Text by Lucas Pantoja

Interview with Mark Bryan
In 2020 Mark Bryan, an American robotic engineer living in Germany, emerged as an Instagram fashion sensation seemingly out of nowhere, for his playful gender-bending style which has garnered him a lengthy list of captivated followers (sitting at 615K currently) and includes some of the fashion industry’s biggest names from Carine Roitfeld to Lotta Volkova. Though it wasn’t Bryan’s style alone that brought him digital fame, as cross-dressing is nothing new and those from the LGBTQ+ community have courageously been doing it for a long time now. Rather, it is the unique context with which Bryan – a straight cis male in his 60s, grandfather of four, and noted American football coach – adorns a uniform of skirts and high heels that has made him so intriguing. Two years after his Instagram success, the unexpected influencer has plenty of credits under his belt, such as stories with some of fashion’s biggest publications like Vogue Germany and Interview Magazine, as well as modeling experiences in Paris fashion week. Most recently he found himself in a controversy after an interview aired with the German television program Beyond Fashion, surprising many of his fans in the LGBTQ+ community with his statements hoping to distance himself from a community of followers that supported him from early on in his fame. The interview is a tense piece in which the host, Avi Jakobs, tears up in shock at Bryan’s questionable responses regarding his relationship with the queer community and his ambition to wear women’s clothing as a purely stylistic choice. We had the chance to speak with Bryan over email regarding his latest controversy, his upbringing in Texas and the early fashion memories that shaped him, plus much more.
In 2010 you moved from Texas to a town in the south of Germany. Do you feel well-accustomed to life in Germany and Europe in general at this point?
Yes, people always ask me how I like living in Germany. My typical reply is that I love everything about Germany but the weather. In Texas, you get 300+ days of sunshine and here you get 300+ days of clouds and rain. Maybe a bit over-exaggerated. I struggle with the language. German is a very difficult language to learn. Even when growing up in Texas, I struggled to learn Spanish. I like to think it’s like walking in high heels — for some, it’s natural and for others, it’s not! And the people here are so kind and understanding.
Was Texas where you spent most of your time growing up?
Yes, West Texas to be more precise. From the day I was born to graduating from college I lived in one place. Then moved to Dallas after graduation. Then lived there mostly till moving to Germany.
What kind of environment did you grow up in, and do you feel that’s played a part in your comfort in experimenting with dress codes?
I grew up in a traditional home. My mother taught us to always look our best, to be clean, our clothing wrinkle-free, and of course to match. Of course, she never expected that someday I’d be wearing high heels and skirts! But even growing up in a very conservative time, I always felt the freedom to express myself through clothing. I always enjoyed wearing a suit and tie, even when young going to church and other events that required a suit, even though the suit wasn’t required.
#DeGenderFashion is what we all want, but I want to take it even further. To de-sexualize fashion. I think this is where I differ from the LGBTQ community. The LGBTQ community has used fashion as a form of expressing their sexuality. Again, I have no problem with that. But clothing/fashion should not dictate gender #DeGenderFashion AND sexual orientation. A person is free to wear what they want, thanks to the LGBTQ community, but fashion, as a causality, is seen as an expression of sexual orientation as a result of their struggles.
So when I said that the LGBTQ community has made it hard on me, I was stating my fight to de- sexualize fashion where people can wear what they want without having their sexuality questioned. I’m fighting a separate war, and it’s against the stigma that the LGBTQ community fought for. And of course, not wanting to disrespect the LGBTQ community, but it’s hard to make that distinction.
What’s your earliest fashion memory? Whether it was the first time: you were awestruck by a garment or advertisement; or experimented with your style?
Perhaps when the plaid baggy pants and the platform high heels were popular in the early 70s. Maybe my first attempt at doing something that was considered trendy and fashionable. Also, I was aware that you never mix brands. For example, If wearing Adidas shorts or a t-shirt, you didn’t wear Puma shoes. So I was aware of branding even at a young age. Later, in college, my first must-have brand was Ralph Lauren and their polo shirts.
You’ve made a career for yourself in engineering and coaching American football, interests we don’t immediately associate with fashion. Nonetheless, has a fashion or personal style always been something important to you, even before you started wearing heels regularly?
I think the way we look and dress reveals a very important part of ourselves. I still wear a jacket and tie whenever possible. Even with the relaxed dress codes in the office I always continued to be overdressed. So yes, fashion is very important to me, I consider it a way to express myself with total freedom. I can choose what to wear, what goes with what, and create my style, which, in my personal opinion, is like a personal brand even if you are away from public opinion or social media.
Have you inspired any of your friends or family to start wearing clothes outside of their respective gender?
No. I don’t think so. That’s up to them and their comfort level. I’d never encourage anyone to do something they weren’t comfortable doing regarding fashion, but I hope to send a message that we can truly be ourselves regardless of what others think.
You recently appeared in a controversial interview on ARD Mediathek’s Beyond Fashion: would you mind speaking on the comments you made that have upset many people, particularly those in the LGBTQIA+ community?
I’m not sure why people think I’ve turned my back on the LGBTQ community. I understand that the LGBTQ community has made it possible for me to legally wear a skirt in public. And yet, if I don’t support the community in some way on my platform, I’m turning my back on them. That is not my intention.
My agenda has always been that clothing doesn’t dictate a person’s sexual orientation or gender. When I said I wasn’t fighting for the community but wasn’t fighting against them either, that meant I wanted to stay neutral. I’m a straight male, what I wear has nothing to do with sexuality. It’s a fashion statement only. It doesn’t mean I don’t respect the community and understand the hardships they have endured to get to where they are today. But to assume I’d fight for them is just that, an assumption. But in a way, I am fighting for the LGBTQ community, and that’s why so many in the community still see me as an ally. Just with me being seen in public or pictures or videos of me on my social media platforms, shows that anyone can wear non-gender conforming clothing. But it’s not fighting specifically for the LGBTQ community, but for everyone.
When I mentioned separation, I was talking about separating fashion from a form of sexual expression. Many in the LGBTQ community use clothing as a way to express their sexuality, which is ok. I’ve said several times, everyone should be free to express themselves, either through fashion or other means. But…. many outside the community and many inside the community associate wearing clothes from another gender to be a form of sexual expression only. It’s hard for them to comprehend that it can be just a fashion statement. So I try to keep my distance/separation from the LGBTQ community so there is less confusion that I’m making a fashion statement and not a sexual statement.
#DeGenderFashion is what we all want, but I want to take it even further. To de-sexualize fashion. I think this is where I differ from the LGBTQ community. The LGBTQ community has used fashion as a form of expressing their sexuality. Again, I have no problem with that. But clothing/fashion should not dictate gender #DeGenderFashion AND sexual orientation. A person is free to wear what they want, thanks to the LGBTQ community, but fashion, as a causality, is seen as an expression of sexual orientation as a result of their struggles.
So when I said that the LGBTQ community has made it hard on me, I was stating my fight to de- sexualize fashion where people can wear what they want without having their sexuality questioned. I’m fighting a separate war, and it’s against the stigma that the LGBTQ community fought for. And of course, not wanting to disrespect the LGBTQ community, but it’s hard to make that distinction.
The interview was over 2 hours long and it was shortened to about 6-7 minutes of footage to be shown. So a lot of cut and paste was done, so that some answers I gave did not have all the content that would make the conversation clear and not taken out of context, as in this case.
In the interview, when I started by saying “It’s not the clothes” I was answering a different question. I was trying to explain what makes it more threatening for a trans female than for me. I’ve been photographed in some very flamboyant outfits along with some very short skirts, but I’d never wear them out on the streets. I try to dress more conservatively and not draw as much attention to myself. Yes, I will draw some looks because of what I’m wearing, but then I also show a lot of confidence in what I’m wearing. Besides that, who wants to attack an old, bald man wearing high heels?
In one part of the interview, when saying something about the LGBTQ community I accidentally left off the T and only said LGB. This was not on purpose as many have assumed. I’m just not good with acronyms and since it’s not something I say very often, I just messed up!
I saw that you posted an apology on your instagram, how else have you been reconciling the situation?
I’ve been trying to educate myself more on the matter. Before this, I wasn’t interested in the details of the struggles of the LGBTQ community as I thought it doesn’t have anything to do with what I’m doing. I’m seeing this as a lesson learned and an opportunity, as this experience has helped me to understand what they have been through and how they feel about others. It has helped me to grow. In my position, as an influencer, I should be better educated on this. So this is my focus as of late.
The interview was over 2 hours long and it was shortened to about 6-7 minutes of footage to be shown. So a lot of cut and paste was done, so that some answers I gave did not have all the content that would make the conversation clear and not taken out of context, as in this case.
In the interview, when I started by saying “It’s not the clothes” I was answering a different question. I was trying to explain what makes it more threatening for a trans female than for me. I’ve been photographed in some very flamboyant outfits along with some very short skirts, but I’d never wear them out on the streets. I try to dress more conservatively and not draw as much attention to myself. Yes, I will draw some looks because of what I’m wearing, but then I also show a lot of confidence in what I’m wearing. Besides that, who wants to attack an old, bald man wearing high heels?
In one part of the interview, when saying something about the LGBTQ community I accidentally left off the T and only said LGB. This was not on purpose as many have assumed. I’m just not good with acronyms and since it’s not something I say very often, I just messed up!
I saw that you posted an apology on your instagram, how else have you been reconciling the situation?
I’ve been trying to educate myself more on the matter. Before this, I wasn’t interested in the details of the struggles of the LGBTQ community as I thought it doesn’t have anything to do with what I’m doing. I’m seeing this as a lesson learned and an opportunity, as this experience has helped me to understand what they have been through and how they feel about others. It has helped me to grow. In my position, as an influencer, I should be better educated on this. So this is my focus as of late.
What kind of conversations did the interview bring about for you? And did it affect any of your relationships offline or in your personal life?
I had a few brands that I have been working with express that they were disappointed in what I had said. Most of them that know me well agreed that the words I chose to use were inappropriate, but could see how what I said could be taken out of context.
As far as personally, I’ve had nothing but support as those that know me and, more importantly, understand how communicate, know what I said was not to be taken as hateful or disrespectful to anyone or any group.
You’ve continued to state your message that clothing should not define one’s gender or sexuality. Surely that’s tied to the way you dress currently, but is there more to how and when that became an important principle of yours?
It became more and more evident that what I was doing on Instagram was helping so many that wanted to wear non-gender conforming clothing but were afraid to have their sexuality questioned. I get over 100 direct messages a day on my Instagram account and a large number of them are followers that have thanked me for the courage to go out wearing something regardless of what others may think. Others still have this fear, however. This needs to change and thus has become one of my goals to de-sexualize clothing. But then I’m also helping everyone (regardless of sexual orientation or gender) that we all should feel comfortable wearing what we want.
On another note, you walked in your first-ever fashion show for Ninamounah FW 22. How was that experience?
It was a blast. At the rehearsals having the choreographer tell you how to walk, with timing and making nice turns, being focused, was interesting and fun. Meeting all the models and asking advice from many. I was at an extreme disadvantage, as almost everyone knew who I was, but I didn’t know anyone. But then after the show and seeing the footage I was amazed that more than half the models just did their own thing. I did what I was told but almost broke into a smile during the finale.
Are you paying attention to the runways and what goes on in the fashion world?
I am paying attention to the fashion designs and trends for men, but particularly seeing more and more skirts on the runway.
Would you like to walk in a show again someday? If so, is there any brand you have in mind?
Yes, I would be interested in doing this again. I think the most challenging for the brands would be to style for me. Taking some of their men’s shirts and jackets and matching them to the women’s skirts and heels may not fit their theme for that collection they won’t show. Of course, big brands like Gucci, Balenciaga, Balmain, Prada, and Alexander McQueen.
If you could wear only one pair of heels for the rest of your life, what would they be?
I’m very tempted to say an 8.5cm to 10cm stiletto pump. But if I had only one pair to wear everywhere, I would have to go with a black leather ankle boot with a wide heel (but not a block heel) and about 9cm high. Either a boot from Jimmy Choo or a boot from Louboutin

Inna Malinovaya „VARVARA“

By /FASHION/, /NEWS/

VARVARA

art director / photographer – Inna Malinovaya, @inna.malinovaya
model – Varvara Shmykova, @barbaraska_92
hair & makeup artist – Veronika Könitzer, @kvamakeup
stylist – Sasha Chumachenko, @shura_delo_govorit
florist – Liia, @sayyes.flowers
retoucher – Alise Poleschuk, @al.poretouch

Blouse – Ellos Collection; Earrings – Vintage; Rings – Kurt Geiger

Blouse – Cult Gaia; Earrings & Ring – Michaela Binder

Bracelet – Vintage; Headpiece – Beretkah; Shirt – Extro&Vert

Jacket – Ipekyol; Gloves – Nera Wenera; Turban – Vintage; Ring – Nicole Schuster

Interview with actress Varvara Shmykova

By /INTERVIEW, /LIFE STYLE/, /NEWS/

Text editor in chief: Irina Rusinovich
Art director / photographer: Inna Malinovaya
Talent: Varvara Shmykova

Interview with actress Varvara Shmykova

How did you discover Film and Theatre? How old were you? How was your journey to becoming a working actor? 

My journey started with my name – Varvara. It’s unusual and fabulous. And with my character, of course.
Theatre has been open for me, perhaps, ever since my childhood. It includes performances in a kindergarten when I was standing on a stool in front of my relatives, along with singing songs or reciting poems on a train Moscow-Glazov when I was 4-5 years old.
There were only a few celebrations or performances I didn’t participate in, whether it was a family celebration, a school concert, or contests at children’s camps. I was always in the spotlight. I could be found on stage at any time. People always knew me as „that red-haired girl with two pigtails and freckles“.
That was followed by children’s school theatre, then children’s professional theatre, and then four years of drama school! After leaving school, it was four years before I enrolled in the Moscow Art Theater on Viktor Ryzhakov’s course, from which I eventually graduated in 2016.
At the end of the first year, we had our first play, which took us all over Russia further to France, Hungary, Estonia, and Croatia… The cinema came a little later, but the theatre was still the primary reason!

Which is your best role so far and why? 

My best role so far is the one I’ve played in a soap opera called „Chiqui“.
It’s the best because it covers the entire spectrum, my whole artistic range, so to speak. And also because the show in itself is a huge success, whichever way you look at it. It’s a courageous and sincere story that left no one indifferent. And to this day, viewers still write to me, asking for a sequel…

How do you select films?

Sometimes I think it’s the film that chooses me, not me.
I’ve been fortunate and proud of all my film works, which always differ from one another. 

Every industry, including the entertainment industry, is full of competition; how do you stand out amidst competition?

That’s a good question.
First of all, I come from a quite large family, so I know a lot about competition.
Secondly, at some point, I got a sense of this unique individuality that everyone really has. We are all very different, and that’s fine. And I’ve never tried to be like someone else or follow any trends. I always try to listen to myself and my heart. Well, thanks to my bright looks and ringing laughter, those who’ve seen me at least once – simply never forget me!

What is the first thing you do to research and approach a role?

I read the material/script/play many, many times.
And I begin to immerse myself in the topic, looking for echoes of it in myself, asking questions about the subject to everyone around me and myself in the first place.

The entertainment industry is known to be full of stress and pressure; how do you tackle the pressure that comes with your work?

It seems to me that stress and I are related. It could be a professional deformation, but I exist like a fish in water in stress and deadline mode. It’s probably hardened since the university. You manage to do everything when you’re working on two plays, studying for three exams, and reading four different books at the same time. 

Are there things you’d like to do other than acting?

Now I have a chapter called motherhood. It’s an exciting and vital experience for me! And speaking of occupations, I’d probably make a great producer! 

What is your strength as an actor?

I’m capable of anything!
P.S. The laughter of an evil genius…

Do you think that success has changed your life? 

It would’ve been a lie if I said it had not.
Success has definitely changed some areas of my life. Some, but not all of me. My status and recognition. I’ve learned to say no and be choosier about people.
But life continues to flow according to my laws and the laws of nature, of course. 

A character you would like to play. 

Speaking of a role, I would prefer a resisting character, some kind of a villainess; otherwise, I’d love to star in a fairy tale or some fictional world. However, overall, I would’ve been happy to get a starring role! 

Tell us about your upcoming shows and how you’re staying on top of things during the geopolitical crisis. 

Recently, just in two months, my companion Misha Shamkov and I made a play via ZOOM, „The Heartbreak Club“. Producers Lisa Paliy and Philip Nesterenko started „Arête“ in Dubai to influence the Gulf countries‘ cultural agenda. We have been their first project!
Also, back then, Misha was in Dubai, while I was in Berlin. I flew in, and we met on stage just one day before the performance. We had a day for all the rehearsals, both acting and technical. And there were two performances in front of an audience, which were, I dare say, spectacular! We hope to tour the world with this show! It is a good thing that it only involves two actors, one table, and two chairs. And, of course, we’d love to play in Berlin!
And soon, in Russia, the series „Mir.druzhba.gum“ will be released, where I have a role in the second plan. It’s a very remarkable story about the ’90s. It is the third season when my character appears on screen for the first time. My partner is the wonderful Yura Borisov (Petrovs in Flu, Compartment number 6, Captain Volkogonov escaped, The bull).

Where do you see your career in five years as an actor?

Now the planning horizon has narrowed to a week… can’t look that far ahead. I want to believe that in five years, I’ll still be an actress because I love my profession very much, and I’m sure I can bring a lot to the world of theatre and cinema. Let’s go on with our lives and see what happens next. 

Lorenzo Ortolani „SHUTTERS DOWN“

By /FASHION/, /NEWS/

SHUTTERS DOWN

STYLIST & ART DIRECTOR: Ludovica Luciani @Ludoo.viica
FOTOGRAFO: Lorenzo Ortolani @lorenzo_orto
MODEL: Giorgia Colasanti @giorgia.colasanti
AGENCY: Act Models @actmodels_
MUA: Martina Tatarelli @tatashadows
DESIGNERS: Orha Roma @orha_roma Ètre Couture @etrecouture Alice Borioni @aliceborioni Giada Stradiotti @_http.jade._ Alberto Ciaschini @albertociaschiniofficial Lotusea @_lotusea_ Anna Sara Napoli @noisy.threads

Dress sparkling by ALICE BORIONI; Net Bag Black by LOTUSEA, designer AMBRA VINELLI; Shoes smoking hot pump patent by ALBERTO CIASCHINI; Balaclava white mesh by NOISY THREADS designer ANNA SARA NAPOLI; Long skirt, corsage and coat blu sky By GIADA STRADIOTTI; Balaclava blu sky by NOISY THREADS designer ANNA SARA NAPOLI.

Dress sparkling by ALICE BORIONI; Net Bag Black by LOTUSEA, designer AMBRA VINELLI; Shoes smoking hot pump patent by ALBERTO CIASCHINI; Balaclava white mesh by NOISY THREADS designer ANNA SARA NAPOLI; Short dress with rounded sleeve and bag, in geometric effect texture black & white tulle. By ÈTRE COUTURE, designer MATTEO BRUCCIANI.

Long skirt, corsage and coat blu sky By GIADA STRADIOTTI; Balaclava blu sky by NOISY THREADS designer ANNA SARA NAPOLI. Dress sparkling by ALICE BORIONI; Net Bag Black by LOTUSEA, designer AMBRA VINELLI; Shoes smoking hot pump patent by ALBERTO CIASCHINI; Balaclava white mesh by NOISY THREADS designer ANNA SARA NAPOLI

Short dress with rounded sleeve and bag, in geometric effect texture black & white tulle. By ÈTRE COUTURE, designer MATTEO BRUCCIANI.
Dress sparkling pink by ORHA ROMA; Net Bag White by LOTUSEA, designer AMBRA VINELLI; Balaclava gold mesh by NOISY THREADS designer ANNA SARA NAPOLI; Long dress and gloves black By ALICE BORIONI; Shoes smoking hot pump elaphe by ALBERTO CIASCHINI
Long dress and gloves black By ALICE BORIONI; Shoes smoking hot pump elaphe by ALBERTO CIASCHINI

Ecoolska brand is one of the first phygital sustainable fashion brands in the world.

By /FASHION/, /NEWS/

On the photo:
Ceo and designer Olska Green
instagram @olskagreen

Ecoolska brand is one of the first phygital sustainable fashion brands in the world.

Ecoolska brand is one of the first phygital sustainable fashion brands in the world.
Olska Green is wearing exclusive upcycling outfits at Milan Fashion Week 2023. Ecoolska develops physical fashion (sustainable seamless activewear from eco-friendly fabrics), creates unique upcycling collections in the heart of Milan and develops digital fashion.

Change the fashion industry to an eco-friendly, digital and transparent via creation of an ecosystem of sustainable innovative Phygital products that reduce overconsumption and overproduction. To give people eco-alternatives: sustainable and digital fashion. We want to make people fashionable, happy and not harmful for environment not only in real life but also in virtual.

Our website: ecoolska.com
Instagram: ecoolska_official@
Twitter: ecoolska

Hessam Yekta „Roamers“

By /FASHION/, /NEWS/

ROAMERS

As the sun began to set, the two girls made their way into the old house. The creaky floorboards added to the strange ambiance that surrounded them. They felt at home in this abandoned place, a place where they could let their true selves shine.

This photoshoot featuring two girls hanging out together exudes a bold and unapologetic energy that is both fierce and captivating. The use of harsh lighting in a vintage setting creates a unique visual aesthetic that emphasizes the characters’ style and their unbridled attitude.

Overall this is about individuality and the importance of staying true to oneself in any environment.

Model: Niloofar @imgoldenlily
Creative Director: Nastaran Rezaee @nastaranrze
Stylist/Creative Director: Saman Amini @samanamini
Makeup Artist: Hanie Abbasi @hanieabbasi.mua
Model: Khatereh @xa.tere
Photographer: Hessam Yekta @hessamyekta

Tops by Hypeupthemood @hypeupthemood

HAZE BAZAAR 002 ART, FASHION & DESIGN SHOW

By /NEWS/
HAZE BAZAAR 002 ART, FASHION & DESIGN SHOW

OPENING VIP RECEPTION THURSDAY 23.03 19:00 – 21:00
SHOW DATES & TIMES FR. – SUN. 24.03 – 02.04 11.00 – 15.00

Are you ready to explore the world of fashion, design, and art? Then join us at the HAZE BAZAAR 02 Art & Fashion Fair.
Experience the latest in fashion photography jewelry design, and art from across the globe! Explore the vast array of art, jewelry and delightful works of art. From designers and creators to fashion enthusiasts, this is the perfect place to find something special. Enjoy the diversity of art and our unique event.
So, come one and come all to the HAZE BAZAAR Fair! See you there!

For more information visit www.hazebazaar.com